Author: Terri Schlichenmeyer

“Faithful: A Novel” by Alice Hoffman

“Faithful: A Novel” by Alice Hoffman c.2016, Simon & Schuster $26.00 / $35.00 Canada 272 pages BOOK REVIEW by TERRI SCHLICHENMEYER The best years of your life. That’s what people tell you about high school. Remember those days, they say. They’ll be the best of your life. But zits, mean girls, broken dreams, and broken friends aren’t exactly best. Sometimes in high school, as in the new book “Faithful” by Alice Hoffman, the very worst things can happen. Nobody thought it was anything but an accident. The road was icy that night. Shelby Richmond was driving and she wasn’t...

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“Nixon’s Gamble” by Ray Locker

“Nixon’s Gamble” by Ray Locker c.2016, Lyons Press $29.95 / $35.95 Canada 352 pages BOOK REVIEW by TERRI SCHLICHENMEYER You can’t fool me. I see what you did there. I’m watching you; you can’t pull the wool over my eyes. I wasn’t born yesterday. I know all the tricks. Yep, I see right through you… but if you say those things often, always remember – as in “Nixon’s Gamble” by Ray Locker – some things aren’t always transparent. In the summer of 1975, Richard Nixon was “bitter and combative” as he testified under oath at a grand jury hearing for a Navy Yeoman accused of leaking secrets to the press. Nixon knew that the Yeoman was innocent, and he said so – also admitting that his “entire White House… was based on secrecy…” It certainly was no secret that Nixon was focused and determined throughout his career. He’d started out in law, served in World War II, then entered politics at the behest of a group of businessmen, ultimately gaining a reputation as a “dirty campaigner” who knew how to collect political allies, and who would do anything to win. By 1968, he was ready to win the Presidency, and accomplish a set of goals. Says Locker, Nixon wanted to restore relations with China , “thaw the Cold War” with Russia , and end the Vietnam War but he’d...

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“Ugly: A Memoir” by Robert Hoge

“Ugly: A Memoir” by Robert Hoge c.2016, Viking $16.99 / higher in Canada 200 pages BOOK REVIEW by TERRI SCHLICHENMEYER You already have a name. Your parents gave it to you when you were born. It might’ve meant something special to them, it might’ve been a name they liked, or something that sounded beautiful. Whatever the situation was, you have a name that’s served you just fine but, as in the new book “Ugly” by Robert Hoge, your classmates often use a different one. Usually, when a baby enters the world, there is a great celebration of its birth but for Australian Robert Hoge, there was silence. He was born with a “massive bulge” from his forehead to the place where his nose should’ve been and his eyes were on either side of his head. His legs were both “mangled” and misshapen. His mother, expecting her fifth child, instead “got a little monster,” Hoge says. A week after his birth, when his mother went to see him for the first time, Hoge says she “did not care about her son.” His parents planned on giving him up but they first decided to discuss the matter with Hoge’s siblings, who insisted their parents fetch the baby – and so, just over a month after his birth, Hoge went home with his family. It didn’t take long for them to realize...

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“The Motion of Puppets” by Keith Donohue

“The Motion of Puppets” by Keith Donohue c.2016, Picador $26.00 / $37.00 Canada 263 pages BOOK REVIEW by TERRI SCHLICHENMEYER Lately, there are days when you don’t move so well. Sports injuries old or new, creaky bones, long night, short night, slept wrong, it can happen at anytime and any age. But, unlike in the new book “The Motion of Puppets” by Keith Donoghue, your life is still yours, no strings attached. The toy store was almost never open. Time and again, Kay and Theo walked past it, charmed, and tried the door but there was never anyone there. They probably couldn’t have afforded anything anyhow; the income from a cirque acrobat (her) and a transcriptionist (him) wasn’t enough for frivolous purchases but browsing could’ve been fun. It might’ve also been a nice distraction from the stresses of being newlyweds in a temporary home. They’d moved to Quebec from Vermont for the sake of work, but neither was happy: Theo was often flustered by his beautiful wife, and Kay was bored – which was perhaps why she impulsively agreed to attend an after-hours party with the cirque’s manager, a notorious womanizer. But Kay loved her husband and could never enjoy a dalliance, so she left the party alone. Walking home, her imagination overcame her and she was sure she was being followed; when she saw a light in the...

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“The Wonder” by Emma Donoghue

“The Wonder” by Emma Donoghue c.2016, Little, Brown $27.00 304 pages c.2016, HarperCollins $32.99 Canada 304 pages BOOK REVIEW by TERRI SCHLICHENMEYER The truth was bent a little bit. Okay, so it was actually mangled. Warped beyond anything that might remotely be real. Wrapped up in a colossal “liar-liar-pants-on-fire” conflagration. The truth was nowhere near the lie you told to save face, to save feelings, or as in the new novel “The Wonder” by Emma Donoghue, to save a life. Lib Wright was so angry, she could hardly breathe. Yes, she was told that she would be handsomely paid and put up – which was true – but she was also told that her skills as a nurse were essential, which was a lie. All those years of working in a field hospital in the Crimean War, all the time spent learning from the great Miss Nightingale, all the hours spent on patient care, and these Irish villagers were telling her that her assignment was to be little more than jailer. Anna O’Donnell, they said, was eleven years old and hadn’t had a bite of food for four months. She consumed water by the spoonful, which was to say sparingly, and skeptics had come ‘round. To prove that the child’s feat was a miracle of God, a committee had hired Lib and an elderly nun to watch the girl’s...

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