Author: Terri Schlichenmeyer

“Trust Me, I’m Dr. Ozzy: Advice from Rock’s Ultimate Survivor” by Ozzy Osbourne

“Trust Me, I’m Dr. Ozzy: Advice from Rock’s Ultimate Survivor” by Ozzy Osbourne c.2011, Grand Central Publishing $26.99 / $29.99 Canada 274 pages   By TERRI SCHLICHENMEYER You can feel it down to your bones. You’ve got a pain in the neck, for one thing. No, not that kind – a real pain in the neck and it’s not going away.  Work has been a headache – literally – and your feelings are a little bruised. Maybe it’s all because you fell head over heels in love and broke your heart on a few sharp words. It happens, you know. Perhaps it’s time to seek counsel. Perhaps it’s time to grab “Trust Me, I’m Dr. Ozzy: Advice from Rock’s Ultimate Survivor” by Ozzy Osbourne, and get an opinion from a doc that rocks. When someone has endured 40 straight years of drinking and drug-taking, has lived through a few car-crashes, and has returned from the dead at least once, you’d expect him to know a thing or two about survival, right?  That’s Ozzy Osbourne, who was approached a few years ago by a bloke who asked if Osbourne would write an advice column. Osbourne was surprised, but decided to give it a go. He is, after all, an anomaly: until recently, doctors didn’t know how he withstood four solid decades under the influence. The fact that he survived surely...

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“The Secret Lives of Wives” by Iris Krasnow

“The Secret Lives of Wives” by Iris Krasnow c.2011, Gotham Books $26.00 / $30.00 Canada 267 pages   By TERRI SCHLICHENMEYER You saw them walking around town today. Everyone did, and they all smiled. They had to be seventy- or even eighty-something. He had a cane over one elbow and his other was crooked for her. She held tight to him as they walked and talked and when she looked at him, years melted away. They were so in love, and you wondered how they sustained it. How did they manage to stay together through everything that happens over decades of marriage? Wed for over 20 years, author Iris Krasnow thinks she knows.  In her new book “The Secret Lives of Wives,” she explains. When you’re a bride – particularly a first-time bride – nervous is normal. You love that guy you’re hitched to now, but what if marriage turns out to be a big mistake? If you married today for the first time, you’d have had plenty of time to consider things. Modern newlyweds are older than those of yesteryear, they’re more educated, and more affluent. What’s more, over 85% of us will marry at some time in our lives. So what keeps a couple together? The first thing, says Krasnow, is to “work on yourself” and to keep part of your identity separate from that of your...

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“Cat Calls” by Jeanne Adlon and Susan Logan

“Cat Calls” by Jeanne Adlon and Susan Logan c.2011, SquareOne Publishers $14.95 U.S. 123 pages   By TERRI SCHLICHENMEYER You’ve been thinking lately about the pitter-patter of tiny feet. You love a round baby belly and tiny baby ears. You long to gaze into an innocent little face as you hold your baby in your arms. Definitely – it’s time to bring new life to your household. But first, there’s so much to do. You need to get a new litter box, catnip toys, and a collar with a bell. And, according to authors Jeanne Adlon and Susan Logan, you’ll also want to kitten-proof your home. In their new book “Cat Calls,” they’ll give you lots more advice on being a new cat owner. For most of her life, Jeanne Adlon has been an animal lover. She worked with Cleveland Amory and his Fund for Animals. She owned a Manhattan boutique for cats and their owners, and she was one of New York City’s first full-time cat sitters. The job, she says, “is not for wimps.” Adlon has climbed up fire escapes to find her clients. She’s broken into apartments, dodged paint tarps, and she’s been clawed, scratched and ignored. Still, she loves her job because it’s “never dull.” If you’re game, there are lots of places to adopt a cat, says Adlon. You might know someone with free...

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“The Night Circus” by Erin Morgenstern

“The Night Circus” by Erin Morgenstern c.2011, Doubleday $26.95 / $32.00 Canada 384 pages   By TERRI SCHLICHENMEYER Some days, you feel like you’re living inside a circus. Each morning, your family races out the door like a herd of elephants. At work, you’re surrounded by clowns and dealing with a dog-and-pony show. You juggle, swing schedules, walk a tight rope, crack the whip, and are often surprised you don’t trip over a tent stake. Life is a circus, but you’ve never lived inside a three-ringer like Le Cirque des Rȇves. And as you’ll see in the new novel “The Night Circus” by Erin Morgenstern, neither has anybody else. The circus always appeared quietly, as if it were sneaking into town. Nobody ever remembered seeing signs or hearing a train or sounds of the Big Top setting up. One minute, it seemed, there was a bare field. The next minute, it was filled with black-and-white striped canvas and a sign out front: Le Cirque des Rȇves opened at sundown. Few were better suited for circus work than Celia Bowen. Beautiful, almost luminous, Celia was The Illusionist who made silent magic every night in front of an audience, then disappeared until the next show. But magic wasn’t her only job: Celia held the circus together with the talents her father helped refine. When she was just six years old, little...

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“The Last Deployment” by Bronson Lemer

“The Last Deployment: How a Gay, Hammer-Swinging Twentysomething Survived a Year in Iraq” by Bronson Lemer c.2011, University of Wisconsin Press $24.95 U.S. & Canada 223 pages By TERRI SCHLICHENMEYER They’ve become as familiar to you as your own living room: auditoriums filled with uniformed, spine-straight soldiers on their way to deployment, or smiling men and women, arms full of family, on their way home. And no matter what auditorium they’re in, no matter which small town or big city, you can bet that the first group is wondering what the second group has seen. They may never know, though, because much is buried and more is classified. But military secrets aren’t the only ones kept in times of war. In the new book “The Last Deployment” by Bronson Lemer, you’ll learn one of them. Bronson Lemer was “probably the last person anyone expected to join the military.” But, as the oldest of six children, he wanted to get away from North Dakota and “the army… happened to be at the right place at the right time.” Lemer was still in high school when he joined the National Guard. Five years later, on January 20, 2003, his cell phone rang. Though he was months away from getting out of his Guard obligation and was “tired of it”, Lemer learned that he was being deployed.  His “horrible decision” to join...

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