By ERIC A. HOWALD

Of the Keizertimes

Residents of Adam Court Northeast and Brooks Avenue Northeast turned out en force at a meeting of the Keizer Traffic Safety, Bikeways and Pedestrian Committee on Thursday, Jan. 10. 

The group requested that the committee take action to make the intersection of Adam Court, Brooks Avenue and Thorman/Manbrin avenues safer. Residents said that making a left turn out of either street onto Thorman or Manbrin represented a leap of faith. 

“I will go a mile out of my way to avoid that intersection,” said Brooks Avenue resident Deanna Gregory. 

Adam Court resident Sarah Adams said she had moved her child’s safety seat to the left side of her car to make certain her kid would be on the opposite side of a possible impact when making right turns out of her neighborhood. 

During the committee’s December meeting, member Joe Tillman put in a request for an analysis of the intersection. The area residents turned out in an effort to press the matter. 

Resident Roger Courser requested that the intersection be converted into a four-way stop – there are already stop signs on Adam and Brooks at the intersection. 

“The street makes a turn there and you cannot see the oncoming traffic,” Courser said. 

Mike Griffin, the Public Works liaison to the committee, said he’d floated the idea of a four-way stop to Public Works Director Bill Lawyer, but it was a nonstarter. 

It’s the second time in recent months the committee has been asked to address concerns in the area. Previously, other residents requested a stop to on-street parking along Manbrin. 

Committee members Kathy Lincoln and Tillman agreed to meet at the site with Keizer Public Works employees to discuss potential solutions and report back at the February meeting. 

The other major news out of the meeting was it appears as though Keizer will not be a recipient of state grants to fund Safe Routes to Schools projects in the city. 

Last year, the city put in grant requests to install curbs and sidewalks along Delight Street Northeast and in the area around Kennedy Elementary School. 

Committee member Pat Fisher attended a meeting of the group determining which projects would receive funding in December and said Keizer’s projects weren’t among the top qualifiers. 

“I found the process very different in that they weren’t talking about the merits of specific projects. They talked about the geographic distribution,” Fisher said. 

Fisher was told that all projects are still, technically, in the running, but Keizer’s projects were not on the high priority lists revealed at the December meeting.