Month: June 2017

Lady Celts fall in quarters

By DEREK WILEY Of the Keizertimes OREGON CITY—There wasn’t a dry eye, including coaches, as the McNary softball team gathered in the outfield here after a 7-4 loss in the quarterfinals of the state playoffs on Friday, May 26. “They love each other,” an emotional head coach Kevin Wise said. “It’s just a great group of girls. They kind of become like sisters. I think when you’re family, you fight for each other. That’s what they did. “It’s a tough one.” The Lady Celts led for most of the game, jumping on No. 1 Oregon City and University of Oregon-bound pitcher Morgan Hornback for a run in the first inning as Haley Ebner singled and then scored on a double by Hannah Carr. The Pioneers tied the contest at 1-1 in the bottom of the third, drawing a walk and then laying down back-to-back bunt singles off Faith Danner, who didn’t allow a ball out of the infield until there were two outs in the fourth. McNary broke the contest open in the top of the fifth. After Sabella Alfaro doubled, Ebner brought her home with a two-out single to right field. Taking advantage of an error, Ebner and Nadia Witt then scored on a ground ball by Carr that went through the shortstop’s legs and rolled all the way to the fence to give the Lady Celts a...

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New fence to keep out bad neighbors

By ERIC A. HOWALD Of the Keizertimes As a new fence went up around the Rickman Community Garden Saturday, May 27, Peggy Moore wanted to kiss every post and hug each of the five volunteers who made it possible. “We needed this so bad. Whenever we’ve talked to the other gardeners, this was the thing they wanted most,” Peggy said. Peggy and her husband, Jerry, are the garden coordinators. The garden, which sits west of the Keizer Civic Center in Chalmers Jones Park, makes gardening possible for 17 local families without the space to do one in their own...

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What would I do?

By LYNDON ZAITZ Most people would like to think of themselves as the type of person who come to the aid of the fellow man, even step into harm’s way, if necessary. On Friday, May 26, on a MAX train at the Hollywood Transit Center in Portland, three men—strangers to each other— fell victims to their own good intentions. The three men confronted a man who was verbally abusing two teenage girls, one of whom was wearing a hijab. Ricky John Best, 53, and Taliesin Myrddin Namkai Meche, 23, were killed. Micah David-Cole Fletcher, 21, was injured. These men...

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Trump flexes U.S. muscle

By DEBRA J. SAUNDERS President Donald Trump may find Washington a hostile home lurking with political foes who want payback for his harsh rhetoric on the campaign trail. Funny thing, though: On his first foreign trip as president, the one-time isolationist found forgiveness and bonhomie from leaders and nations he trolled during the 2016 campaign. In Saudi Arabia, King Salman bin Abdul-Aziz Al Saud Salman rolled out a red carpet for Trump and hosted meetings with Muslim and Arab leaders. In Israel, Trump had positive talks with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas. The Vatican described Trump’s audience with Pope Francis as “cordial.” He accused the Saudis of blowing up the World Trade Center. He supported a “total and complete shutdown” on allowing Muslims to enter the United States. Abbas and the Saudi royal family are Muslims. As a candidate, Trump tweeted that the pontiff was “disgraceful” for questioning his faith. In Washington, there’s no getting over 2016. Democrats in Congress are loath to appear publicly with Trump. Party leaders don’t want to be seen working with his administration. After spending the last eight years denouncing Republican obstructionism, they’ve come up with a new word— “resistance”—for the same behavior, which they now find laudable. They’re can’t and won’t get over 2016, while the Saudi King, Palestinian leader and Catholic Pope can. Then again, Saudi...

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A wealthy nation’s health problem

By GENE H. McINTYRE There are 435 representatives in the U.S. House, each representing close to 733,000 of their fellow Americans. This number is derived from the U.S. population number of 318.9 million by the 2010 census.  The roles and duties of each member of Congress are understood to include representation, legislation, and constituent service and education as well as political and electoral activities. This writer expects his representative and all the others to come to grips with the dimensions of their role by developing a lawful approach to their tasks, demonstrating fidelity to those who send them. What’s happened most recently in the U.S. House of Representatives, however, does not embrace the expected standard.  Take the example of House Speaker Paul Ryan, a Republican from Wisconsin.  He was gleeful the other day with the GOP health plan because it’s “us keeping our promises.” Yet, his statement is only partially true as, while he and his fellow Republicans did pass a regressive health care bill, one has to question how well he’s representing his constituents since it’s anticipated that at least 23 million Americans will find it financially impossible to afford the premiums, expected to rise by 850 percent. Then, too, Ryan, Trump and a majority of GOP representatives now find themselves in an awkward place.  They made all kinds of specific guarantees tied to their health care legislation and then proceeded to break most of them without explanation which could and should make their back-home visits before and...

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