Month: September 2016

This veteran will honor anthem

To the Editor: First, thanks to Gene McIntyre for his remarks in last week’s Keizertimes (Protests during national anthem, Sept. 23). I would like to add just one item regarding the United States Code having to do with rising, removing your hat and standing at attention for the playing of the national anthem. Legislation passed by Congress a few years ago modified the code to permit veterans to present the hand salute for all appropriate occasions. Note, it would permit, not require the salute. On a personal note, I have been reluctant to salute for most occasions because my time in the Air Force was between conflicts. However, due to the recent activities of a few, I have decided to begin the practice when in public. And I would urge other veterans to do the same. I think it would show that we outnumber the complainers. Wayne A. Moreland...

Read More

Thank you community

To the Editor: McNary High School’s Band Day was a huge success! The band was out in full force on Sept. 10 collecting refundable cans, bottles and monetary donations. One hundred and fifteen band members, over 25 parent volunteers, the entire band booster staff and the amazing members of our beloved Keizer community came together to support the students of the McNary Band in a one-day rush to collect two semi-trailers full of cans and over $7,000 in monetary donations. This year was an amazing show of support from our community, we surpassed the amount of monetary donations we have received in the past and again filled to trailers. You helped us hold another successful Band Day. One student said “This is fun, do we do this every weekend?” The band students of McNary High School begin in early August getting music and drill ready for the marching season. They consistently work hard though the entire year to build their musical skills and talents and to support our fellow student athletes at the football and basketball games. They themselves compete for the state band championship and at the individual state solo and ensemble championships each year. The funds we collect on Band Day keep the tradition of musical excellence achievable. With all the expenses we face to keep the program running your support on our Band Day, and even...

Read More

Donald Trump clings to deception

By MICHAEL GERSON    There is a story from the history of professional wrestling in which a manager named Freddie Blassie comes to the edge of the ring and, while the referee is distracted, breaks a cane over the head of the opposing wrestler. After the match an interviewer asked Blassie, “Where’s that cane of yours?” He replied, “What cane? I didn’t have no cane!” During the last political year, life has imitated professional wrestling. Those expecting such antics from Donald Trump during the first presidential debate were not disappointed. When confronted with his claim that global warming was a hoax perpetrated by the Chinese, Trump replied, “I did not [say it].” He did. When Trump’s claim that he could not release his tax returns because of an IRS audit was exposed as false, he still insisted on it. When charged with saying that he could personally negotiate down the national debt, he said this was “wrong.” The charge was right. When Trump’s transparently deceptive claim to be an early opponent of the Iraq War was debunked, he doubled down in a babbling defense citing Sean Hannity as the ultimate arbiter. It is not surprising that Trump inhabits his own factual universe, in which truth is determined by usefulness and lies become credible through repetition. What made the first presidential debate extraordinary was not the charges that Trump denied,...

Read More

Stop blaming PERS for money problems

A number of Oregonians chronically grouse about and wring their hands over the cost of PERS as causing all the state’s fiscal problems. However, fairness and law reigned and the Oregon Supreme Court shot down the plan to cut PERS retirees’ benefits due established and continued by contractual obligations. But when it has come to raising taxes on those most able to pay by their business profits, the Oregon legislature ducks and covers. Meanwhile, Oregon’s corporate minimum tax is ridiculously low.  It’s been stuck at a pathetically low $10 since 1931.  This level was at one time even an embarrassment to Oregon’s business community. In 2009, during the Great Recession that hammered the state’s finances, the Oregon corporate lobby stepped up with a couple of tax proposals. Led by Associated Business Industries (AOI), a business coalition proposed a flat minimum tax on all corporations—C-corporations and S-corporations—with a plan that called for a minimum tax of $300 a year, regardless of a company’s profits. Another group, Oregon Business Association (OBA), recommended charging S-corporations a flat $250 regardless the level of sales or profits.  For C-corporations this group proposed a sliding scale starting at $250 per year and capping at $25,000 based on corporate in-state sales, not profits or taxing gross receipts. The legislature adopted OBA’s idea, playing a bit with the details.  For S-corporations, the legislature set the minimum tax at $150, obviously less that what AOI and OBA sought. For C-corporations,...

Read More