Curt McCormack, of the Keizer Community Food Bank, and Chief John Teague, of the Keizer Police Department, accept $2,500 donations from members of the Making Keizer Better Foundation, including Kim Freeman, Cathy Clark, Lyndon Zaitz and Paul Pfnister. (KEIZERTIMES/Eric A. Howald)

Curt McCormack, of the Keizer Community Food Bank, and Chief John Teague, of the Keizer Police Department, accept $2,500 donations from members of the Making Keizer Better Foundation, including Kim Freeman, Cathy Clark, Lyndon Zaitz and Paul Pfnister. (KEIZERTIMES/Eric A. Howald)

By ERIC A. HOWALD
Of the Keizertimes

Curt McCormack, executive director of the Keizer Community Food Bank (KCFB), breathed a sigh of relief when he got a call from Lyndon Zaitz of the Making Keizer Better Foundation (MKB).

Zaitz, chair of the now-disbanded MKB which ran the annual RIVERfair event, called to let him know that a $2,500 donation was on its way to the KCFB.

“It’s been a grim summer in terms of food and monetary donations,” said McCormack as he accepted the donation at the Keizer City Council meeting Monday, Aug. 1. “We’ve been having to buy more food and we’ve probably had to turn away about 10 families in the past couple of months because we’ve run out.”

While food donations can help the food bank in a pinch, McCormack said the monetary donations go further. The food bank is able to purchase nearly $3 of food for every $1 donated.

The Keizer Community Food Bank, which is run by an alliance of five local churches at Faith Lutheran Church on River Road North, serves about 300 families a month on Mondays from 6 to 7:30 p.m. and Thursdays from 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

Those interested in making a donation to the food bank can call 503-871-9100. Volunteers are also needed, and McCormack suggested dropping by the site during service hours to find out how to plug in.

MKB also made a second $2,500 donation to the Keizer Police Department K-9 Unit.

Keizer Police Chief John Teague said the donation would be used as seed money for a project long in the planning.

“We’ve been talking about getting cameras for the dogs,” said Teague. “With the cameras, we can insert the dogs into situations to get a better view of what is happening and even communicate with suspects through the camera.”