Day: March 10, 2016

The demagogue that America’s founders feared

By MICHAEL GERSON       “The effect of liberty to individuals is that they may do what they please; we ought to see what it will please them to do, before we risk congratulations.” — Edmund Burke      WASHINGTON — As the unthinkable becomes likely, the question arises: Who is really to blame for Donald Trump?      The proximate answer is a durable plurality in the Republican primary electorate, concentrated among non-college-educated whites but not limited to them. They are applying Trump like a wrecking ball against the old political order. And it clearly does not matter to them if their instrument is qualified, honest, stable, knowledgeable, ethical, consistent or honorable.      But why has this group of voters cohered, while other elements of the Republican coalition have fractured?      Some blame compromised Republican leaders who have resolutely refused to do things — such as unilaterally overturning Obamacare — that they actually lack the constitutional power to do. Or maybe the establishment invited a backlash for insufficient toughness on illegal immigration — though it is hard to imagine why public urgency would spike just as the flow of illegal immigration has slowed to a trickle. Or maybe a parallel establishment of conservative talk radio, PACs and websites gains listeners, funds and clicks by inciting conservatives against Republicans.      Or maybe, as reform conservatives have argued, Republicans have not adequately responded to 25 years of...

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Hearing Michigan’s angry voices

By E.J. DIONNE JR.         WASHINGTON — Tuesday in Michigan was brought to you by white working-class men and the people from little towns and small cities. The outcome of a primary that shook the certainties in the Democratic presidential race while also ratifying the ongoing power of Donald Trump’s coalition of discontent was determined by voters who don’t trust trade deals and don’t believe in the promises of the new economy.      Trump and Bernie Sanders are as different as two politicians can be, yet both served as megaphones for a loud cry of protest from the long-suffering and the ignored.      This year’s primaries can be seen as the end of 1980s conservatism in the Republican Party and 1990s moderation in the Democratic Party. The social compact that underwrote each party’s consensus was broken by the long-term effects of working-class income decline and the severe dislocations let loose by the financial collapse of 2008. Economic change has affected regions, states and localities very differently. Few states were as traumatized as Michigan.      Thus did majorities in both parties in Michigan tell exit pollsters that trade takes away rather than creates U.S. jobs. The negative verdict among Republicans was 55 percent to 32 percent, as CNN reported; among Democrats, the figures were 57 percent to 30 percent. Both Trump and Sanders did far better with the critics of trade....

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Carjacker caught after taking car from hotel

A 28-year-old Keizer man was arrested after a carjacking incident Wednesday morning. Shortly before 11 a.m. March 9, Keizer Police Department officers were dispatched to a carjacking incident at the Keizer Quality Suites on Wittenberg Lane. According to a release from the Keizer Police Department, the 51-year-old male victim told police he had been pushed down by a man in his 20s, who then stole his blue 2015 Subaru Outback from the south parking lot of the hotel. The victim suffered minor abrasions when he fell to the ground. The suspect was reported to be armed with a crow bar, or some similar tool. The suspect was later identified as Ryan Otero. While officers searched the area, Sgt. Trevor Wenning spotted the Subaru going eastbound on Dearborn Avenue near Verda Lane. Wenning followed Otero as he drove east on Verda Lane. Once other officers joined Wenning, a high risk traffic stop was initiated on Verda just west of the Salem Parkway. Otero pulled the vehicle over. Initially Otero complied with verbal commands and exited the car with his hands up, but moments later he became defiant, reentering the vehicle and then exiting again with a crow bar. An officer deployed his Taser twice, but was ineffective both times in incapacitating Otero. After the second Taser attempt, Otero threw the crow bar towards officers, got back into the Subaru and...

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Seven Celtic scribes pen One Act Festival

By ERIC A. HOWALD Of the Keizertimes McNary High School senior Morgan Hoag gives the perfect reason why anyone should make sure they’re in the seats for the annual One Act Festival. “It’s the one time you can come to a McNary play and the playwright is going to be in the audience with you,” Hoag said. Hoag is one of seven Celtic writers who produced a microplay for the festival that takes the stage March 10, 11 and 12. Curtain time is 7 p.m. and tickets are $5. In addition to being completely written by students for the first time, each one act is directed by another McNary student and features freshmen and sophomore actors. Each of the plays also ties into the drama department’s theme for the year: the many faces of love. Seniors Alex deMeurers and Krystin Morrell opted to take on two roles in the production. Each wrote one of the one acts and each is directing the play written by the other. deMeurers’ play is titled The Little Things. “It’s a play about a couple at a coffee shop and the light fades up on them at different times in their relationship. It’s basically about watching them fall apart,” he said. deMeurers enrolled in McNary’s playwriting class the past two years and said he found it easier to get words on the page this...

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