Month: March 2015

Anti-vaccination forces hurt all

Rude awakenings, it was once believed, were reserved for other states in our nation.  Now we know from recent events that the one exceptional state, Oregon, is no longer of privileged status as was true in former years.  Our former governor has taken a dive for a girlfriend and it turns out that he may have had a lot of state administrators helping him, those apparently willing to be bossed around by the former governor’s fiancee. But the most threatening among the changes that have come to Oregon of late is that which decries vaccinations and the immunizations against disease that are afforded by them.  In the West, specifically western Europe, experimentation with ways to control disease date back to the 1700s when successful means were found to rid the population of smallpox. Other efforts followed and enabled people and their children to avoid diseases that promised certain death in years past. The means to control polio came to be in my lifetime.  It was a truly dreaded malady that took away a victim’s ability to breathe outside an “iron lung” and other forms of paralysis that deprived those so contracted with not being able to carry on with lives resembling normality.  Jonas Salk was recognized as a hero throughout the nation and that meant a lot of grateful Oregonians, too.  I remember well how I hoped for years I would not get polio and then escaped that worry after receiving my dose of prevention. But what matter of...

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Hillary’s Nixonian path to office

By MICHAEL GERSON   The effective kickoff of Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign was an act of deck clearing so breathtaking, so brazen, that it remains difficult to process. A former secretary of state summoned reporters to the United Nations, made a statement on Iran nuclear negotiations, then admitted deleting more than 30,000 emails she deemed personal from the account she exclusively used while in office.  This was the culmination of a deliberate, multiyear end run around congressional oversight, the Freedom of Information Act and the archiving of federal records. Documents she found inconvenient to sort while in government were convenient to destroy after leaving office. Those looking for a historical parallel turned, inevitably, to one figure. According to Rep. Darrell Issa, R-Calif., Clinton is “a modern, Democratic Richard Nixon.” “Nixon didn’t burn the tapes,” tweeted Joe Scarborough, “but Hillary deleted the emails.” Politico’s Todd Purdum did a careful historical comparison to Nixon, finding Clinton similarly “suspicious, defensive, contemptuous of the press and scornful of political adversaries.” Clinton’s email housecleaning —barring future revelations—may work. She seems to have effectively navigated the gray areas of federal rules to avoid transparency.  But Republicans clearly hope the Nixonian label—which some in the media find credible—will stick. They believe the email controversy, while not politically fatal in isolation, will add to the composite image of a candidate driven by secrecy and resentment, surrounded by a...

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Ted Alan Sharp

Ted Alan Sharp of Keizer lost his battle against cancer Friday, March 20. Sharp was 66. Ted was born in Ontario, Ore. on Aug. 12,1948 to Eugene and Flo Sharp and was raised in New Plymouth, Idaho, graduating from New Plymouth High School in 1966. He graduated from the University of Oregon with a bachelors of science degree in economics in 1970. His graduate work was at Portland State University where he majored in accounting. As a CPA he worked in public accounting for several years later moving to private industry. While at the UO he met his wife Marilyn. They married in 1971 and in 1977 welcomed daughter Sarah. Ted was an avid skier, moving to ski patrol when he entered the accounting world. Racquetball and golf soon followed as favorite pastimes. Ted and Marilyn loved their early marriage treks following history through central Europe, Russia and the U.S. Later, spring breaks were a favorite on any sunny island where he enjoyed snorkeling, sunshine and spending time with friends. When Sarah entered college and her studies took her across the nation and around the world, he and Marilyn enjoyed visiting her as often as possible in her far off and exotic places. Ted dearly loved his family and friends and enjoyed being part of their lives. He was surrounded by many caring and loving people in his final...

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William C. Drakeley Sr.

William C. Drakeley Sr.,101, died Thursday, March 19. He was born October 3, 1913, in Angie, North Dakota, the son of William C. and Sadie P. Jones Drakeley. The family moved to Salem when he was 17 where he graduated from Salem High School. As a young man Bill worked many jobs including logging, the TB Hospital and mowing the Marion County Courthouse lawn. In 1933 he apprenticed under Burt Edwards to learn the meat business. He and Edwards partnered to open Keizer Food Lockers on North River Road in 1948. He was active in forming the Keizer Volunteer Fire Department, the Keizer Lions Club and the Commercial Club which was the predecessor to the Keizer Merchants Association, which later became the Keizer Chamber of Commerce. Bill volunteered many hours for his church, Knight Memorial Congregational and belonged to several fishing organizations. He always worked hard. He met Elva Irene McCune at Knight Memorial Church and they were married May 23, 1936. They had three children: William C. Drakeley III (Joyce), Janice Ellen Brown (Dennis), and Linda Jean Hammer (Peter). There are seven grandchildren, and 13 great-grandchildren. Elva died in 1986.  They had been married 50 years. Following Elva’s passing, he married longtime friend Mildred C. Hallisy on Nov. 28, 1987. He then had an additional family of three stepchildren: James Hallisy (Geri), Marilyn Foster, and Cheryl  Keeney (Richard)....

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Pearson pleads guilty in murder case

By CRAIG MURPHY Of the Keizertimes The son accused in the murder of his mom and the attempted murder of his dad has pled guilty. Brett Angus Pearson, 18, pled guilty on Thursday morning to one count of aggravated murder, one count of attempted murder with a firearm and one count of conspiracy to commit aggravated murder. The charges stemmed from the March 5, 2014 murder of Michelle Pearson and the attempted murder of her husband, Wilfred “Bill” Pearson. The guilty plea was entered in the courtroom of Marion County Circuit Court judge Dale Penn. David Wilson, Marion County deputy district attorney, said the trial against Brett Pearson had been set for Sept. 15 to Oct. 2. The guilty plea means that trial won’t be happening, with sentencing scheduled for Aug. 28. “A lot of times it’s easier on a family to not go through a trial,” Wilson said on Thursday. “There are some details that don’t come out in a change of plea.” Wilson said the sentencing range would be between 30 years and life. At this point, Thursday’s plea has no impact on the other teenager charged in the crime. Brett Pearson’s friend Robert Daniel Miller III, 18, is scheduled to go to trial in November. Wilson said on Thursday’s it is too early to know if Miller will change his plea as well. Both Pearson and...

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