Day: November 21, 2014

Mother-daughter pair tackle team injuries

By ERIC A. HOWALD Of the Keizertimes In the McNary High School varsity football team’s game with Sprague High School, junior kicker Parker Janssen took hit as he made a point-after attempt. With one tackler in front of him and another coming over his back, Parker ended up on the ground and, within a couple of minutes, McNary’s physical trainer Jill Pallin and the physical trainer from Sprague were beginning treatments for shock. Janssen’s leg had been badly fractured. For much of that time, McNary senior Jasmine Ernest was right next to Janssen talking him through the pain and trying to keep his focus off his leg. “We’ve had similar situations with significant injury and the athletes have almost gone into shock. I wanted to keep him calm and focused on breathing. It was easier because we’re friends and it helped me keep his attention,” Ernest said. In a situation that could send many adults running for cover or at least averting their eyes, Ernest projected intense focus and a sense of calm rivaling that of a Hindu cow. “I’ve always thought it is important to have a relationship with a student before he or she gets injured, but Jasmine is like my proof of that. She knows a lot of the athletes and has an easier time engaging them,” Pallin said. It helped that it wasn’t her first...

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The right Day to give

By CRAIG MURPHY Of the Keizertimes Rick Day wants to help out Keizer. Day, owner of Advantage Precast at 1302 Candlewood Drive North in Keizer, gave a list of items he’s willing to donate to help out parks in Keizer during this month’s Keizer Parks and Recreation Advisory Board meeting. New dugouts at Keizer Little League Park? Check. A pedestrian bridge? Check. Patio slabs and fire pits for the amphitheater at Keizer Rapids Park? Again, check. Day, a former Parks Board member, explained why he’s willing to help out. “I’m here to ask the Parks Board to look at the donation of a number of items I see that are needed for parks in Keizer,” Day said. “These are things I’m offering to Keizer parks, free of charge.” Day showed drawings of what the items look like and started with the precast concrete dugout. “This would be multiple sections,” he said. “We make them about seven-feet tall, in eight-feet modules. These are good for 100 years with zero maintenance. You can string a bunch of them together if needed. We can also do drainage and electrical outlets.” The second item was a concrete pedestrian bridge with optional hand rails. “In my second term (on the Parks Board) I saw a wood bridge in a park that seems to be having issues,” said Day, who served through the end of...

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KPIC looks to celebrate Japanese celery farmer

By CRAIG MURPHY Of the Keizertimes After years of discussion, progress is finally being made on the Keizer Points of Interest Committee’s (KPIC) Japanese History Project. The project, discussed again at Tuesday’s KPIC meeting, has been mentioned at most meetings the last couple of years, but mostly just in passing reference. Much of the history revolves around Japanese farmer Roy Fukuda. According to a history report by Virginia Green, Fukuda settled near Lake Labish northeast of Keizer in 1905 and anticipated making his fortune before going back home. However, he met his wife and decided to stay in the Keizer area. According to Green’s document, Fukuda transformed the beaver marshes into profitable farmland, which led to more Japanese families coming to the area. At one point nearly 50 Japanese families were farming small plots around Lake Labish, expanding to farm in Keizer and Independence as well as owning businesses in Salem. In 1920 The Statesman did a story on Fukuda and his successful celery growing business, an industry that had grown to $100,000 in output a year by that time. According to the article, Fukuda started growing celery in 1909 with 10 rows, between 2,000 and 3,000 plants. By 1920 Fukuda had an estimated 400,000 plants. Among other places, the quality of the crop was appreciated in Washington, D.C. On Nov. 25, 1925, U.S. Senator Charles McNary – the...

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Hohnbaum goes off on plans

By CRAIG MURPHY Of the Keizertimes The recently introduced plans for Area C of Keizer Station have been met by a familiar foe. Kevin Hohnbaum, who has fought previous Area C proposal on behalf of the Keep Keizer Livable (KKL) neighborhood group, has filed a formal protest against the revised Area C plans. Last month, officials from Mountain West Investment Corporation and Bonaventure Senior Living publicly introduced plans for apartments and a senior living center during a meeting with Area C neighbors. Plans were originally scheduled to be brought to the Keizer City Council on Dec. 1. Nate Brown, director of Community Development, said last weekend that timeline has been pushed back to January. Part of the reason for having the topic come up in December was the current councilors have more familiarity with the history of Area C. Veteran councilors Jim Taylor and Joe Egli, in addition to mayor Lore Christopher, will not be on the council come January. The plans are the first for the area since a previous proposal – which at one time included a large retail store believed to be Walmart before being downsized – stalled out two years ago. Those plans had been protested by KKL, as the organization took the case to the Land Use Board of Appeals (LUBA). Last week, Hohnbaum sent a letter of protest to Brown’s department. He sent...

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People control

To the Editor: It’s a shame that more people don’t realize that violent crimes are committed by people and not inanimate objects.  Knives, firearms, blunt objects, and motor vehicles do not commit violent acts. People commit violent acts.  Until this is understood and until society and our justice system deal effectively with the people who commit violent crime there will be little accomplished. The recent tragic murder of a Linfield College student is a glaring example. Gun control means different things to different people and many simply do not understand the laws in affect today.  Firearms cannot by bought online unless the transaction goes through a licensed dealer who conducts a background check. In Oregon all firearm sales at gun shows require a background check.  It is illegal for a private party to sell a firearm to another private party that does not reside in the same state.  It is illegal for a private party to sell a firearm to another private party if there is knowledge the buyer cannot legally poses a firearm. No doubt the Oregon legislature will attempt to enact additional gun control legislation.  In my opinion this will accomplish little to reduce violent crime.  The only winner will be state government because a fee is collected every time a background check is conducted in Oregon.  Oregon will collect about $2 million dollars this year from...

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