Day: June 20, 2014

Why not preserve Keizer history?

To the Editor: The first 30 years of my life were spent in Keizer, until a job took me to Washington state. I still regularly visit family there and I am concerned about my hometown and what happens to it. With the exception of the inspired few who toil endlessly at the Keizer Heritage Museum, the citizens of Keizer have seemingly lost their appreciation for the history of this little community. Why is there a need for another apartment complex? There are thousands of them in the greater Salem-Keizer area. This home that will be torn down has a long rich history in the community, and is one of the few areas left as an open space. Why does every open space have to have a building plopped down on it–usually a strip mall or another apartment that sits half empty? Why not get bids to turn the house into a bed and breakfast with an attached restaurant or even just a nice restaurant by itself. I am disappointed in the editorial, Building on the cow pasture, June 13) that only expresses concern about what a seemingly inevitable apartment complex will look like. Yes, there is a lot of traffic at that intersection; why make it worse by  putting a lot of people in apartments along with their cars which will make more traffic.  Why not encourage the citizens...

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Anything but boots on the ground

To the Editor: Things are happening so fast in the Middle East right now and our options are so limited that it is difficult to see what the United States can and should do to protect its interests and the unfortunate people caught in the middle.  Too, the wrong actions on our part could very well result in bringing terrorist attacks to our own shores. The investment that the United States has made in lives and treasure in Iraq creates a great urge to do something.  Yes, to do something but what?  Like Vietnam, our invasion of Iraq was ill-conceived and plagued by faulty intelligence together with misunderstanding of the land, the people, the culture and history! I received a little encouragement the other day when the president announced that further aid to the Iraqi government would be conditioned on correction of the exclusionary policies that seem to have fueled the present unrest.  Pundits suggest that this is unlikely to occur or that it simply may be too late.  One thing is clear, we must not allow ourselves to be dragged back into something that we should never have become involved in the first place. Art Burr...

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An educational use for pasture?

In the 1980s we Americans were reminded by a national leader, then-House Speaker Tip O’Neill, that “All politics is local.”  A corollary of sorts to that fact is that personal opinion on local matters often trumps everything else on the advantages of selecting the right place to call “home.” As anyone can attest from the traffic increase, Keizer is evermore frequently called “home” these days.  And, like fellow Keizer residents Maddy Kephart, who finds cows cute, as I do (even if it’s unmanly to admit it), and Debbie Crooks, who just does not want a farm scene to disappear from her daily view (she with the tenacity to stand on a corner with a sign expressing her sentiments), there’s likely a widespread wish the cows and the bucolic scene along a short stretch of Verda Lane could be preserved. My opinion offers the argument, that’s likely endorsed by Kephart and Crooks, that Keizer, Oregon, is a fine place to live and we’d like to keep it that way.  So, saving even a small piece of Oregon’s one-time nearly-exclusive agricultural-based past would be an added plus to a place that, to begin with, has a lot of ‘specials’ to be appreciated and protected. Keizer’s got so much going for it that the list of pluses could easily stretch to book length.  Pick any one, such as the relatively light traffic (except for some tolerably heavy use weekday mornings and evenings) but is so much more desirable and less aggravating to use than, let’s say, for two examples, just...

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Conventional wisdom is neither

Two weeks have passed and wisdom still hasn’t arrived.  My parents’ generation has been called “The Greatest Generation.” Do you suppose wisdom enabled them to produce 30 years’ unparalleled expansion of middle class wealth and opportunity?  I can’t remember my parents being actively engaged in national or global politics, or being expected to.  Did they cause this growth or were they just lucky? The first 20 years of their marriage were not troubled by the televised intrusion of world news—we got our first television in about 1959.  Fast forward to 2014.  The Internet not only provides live coverage of everything everywhere in the world, but you can choose coverage that reinforces your own bias.  If a little knowledge is a dangerous thing we are deafened by alarm bells. Isaac Asimov said, “The saddest aspect of life right now is that science gathers knowledge faster than society gathers wisdom.” The modern corollary might be that the world-wide Internet is spreading information faster than we can disprove it.  We as citizens have some serious challenges to face.  We can’t succeed without sharing some beliefs. As recently as yesterday I have seen posts on Facebook claiming that the killing of 20 students and six adults at Sandy Hook was a government hoax.  One acquaintance posted a story from somewhere that many scientists believe that climate change as caused by human activities is...

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Volcanoes fall 11-2 in season opener

By HERB SWETT For the Keizertimes An 11-2 loss to the Vancouver Canadians, last year’s Northwest League champion, opened the 2014 season for the Salem-Keizer Volcanoes June 13 at home before a crowd of 3,552. Drew Leenhouts, an all-star pitcher last year, had a rough start, giving up two runs in the first inning and one in the second before settling down for the third, fourth and fifth.  He was the losing pitcher; Vancouver led all the way. Tyler Hollick and Christian Arroyo combined for three of the Volcanoes’ four hits. Hollick hit a single and a triple and scored both Salem-Keizer runs. Arroyo had a single and drove in both runs. In the Canadian first inning, Franklin Barreto hit a one-out infield single and scored when David Harris tripled to center field. Harris scored as Boomer Collins grounded out. The Volcanoes responded with one run in the first. Hollick walked and reached third base on a wild pickoff attempt by starting pitcher Alberto Tirado. Arroyo brought him home with a single to right. Jonathan Davis led off the Vancouver second with a triple to left center. Sean Hurley walked. Christian Vasquez hit into a double play that allowed Davis to score. Errors that put Travious Relaford and Geno Escalante on base in the bottom of the second gave the Volcanoes hope of catching up, but Tirado retired the...

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