Day: June 6, 2014

Bring history alive

Several years ago the Oral History of Keizer project was going strong. Led by the Keizer Points of Interest Committee, older Keizerites were interviewed on camera about our city. Interviewed subjects talked about the origins of Keizer’s cherished organizations such as Keizer Little League the Keizer Rotary Club and the Keizer Rural Fire District. This project should not die; there is more history that can be preserved for future generations. History tells us where we’ve been and who we were. Some people, especially those who have lived here for 20 years or less, can look around our city and think there is no history here. The Keizer Points of Interest Committe has done a good job of identifying important sites in Keizer dating back to the 1800s. Sure, there is no remnants of Thomas Dove Keizur’s homestead, but there is a sign placed where it was located, at what is now Chemawa and River Roads, in front of Shari’s Restaurant. Oral history of our city just as important as signs pointing out what was here more than 100 years ago. Those who can remember what live in Keizer was like back in the 1940s and 1950s should be encouraged to take part in the project. Nothing makes history come alive more than the memories of those who lived it. It is important to commit those memories to film. The...

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KLL poison oak

To the Editor: I think it’s funny to read the sanitized version of what happened regarding the poison oak at Keizer Little League field.  The coach had no problem leaving his name, along with his poor wife’s picture covered in poison oak.  He tried for nearly two weeks talking to league officials and got nowhere until it was brought to Facebook and the attention of the city officials. Thank you to the City of Keizer for fencing it off.  That’s a good start. Jeanne Fredrickson...

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A vision for Keizer Rapids Park

To the Editor: With the advent of bringing 58 acres of park land at Keizer Rapids Park into Keizer’s urban growth boundary, there is a great opportunity to revise the current plan and master plan the new acreage, “the filbert orchard area.” The city council and the Keizer Parks and Recreation Advisory Board are looking for input on amenities to be included in the park. The West Keizer Neighborhood Association will be holding a Special meeting on Thursday, June 12, at Keizer Civic Center at 7 p.m.  The focus of the meeting will be  to gather input on what amenities the WKNA members would like to see at Keizer Rapids Park. For more information, go to www.westkeizerna.org. Please come to the meeting to ddshare your vision for the new Keizer Rapids Park”. Rhonda Rich...

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What has become of wisdom?

A Box of Soap By DON VOWELL Each day I expect to answer the bell and find wisdom on my doorstep, ready to move in.  With age was supposed to come wisdom.  Age has found me and is comfortably settled in but wisdom is somewhere delayed. “Many persons might have attained to wisdom had they not assumed they had already possessed it”-—Seneca. Our Bartlett’s book of quotations shows signs of much use.  I turn to it when wondering what actual wise people have to say about just about everything.  For a person too shiftless to read the great thinkers it’s the next best thing.  The notable thing about the best wisdom quotes is that none of them are contemporary.  Wisdom is not trending right now. “There is danger that if the court does not temper its doctrinaire logic with a little practical wisdom, it will convert the Constitutional Bill of Rights into a suicide pact.”—Robert H. Jackson. The Supreme Court should have the best and wisest legal minds in America.  They have decided that corporations are persons and money is speech.  See if you can find any “practical wisdom” in that. A strong majority of Americans believe it unwise.  Even if you give them the benefit of the doubt to assume that the narrow majority came to this decision strictly on the basis of constitutional law, it is wrong. ...

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The most important day was the longest

There were 36,525 days in the 20th century.  Which one stands out to you as most important?  My choice is “The Longest Day.” Arguably, one day among all the days in previous centuries can be singled out as most important. Some would say of the 1800s, for example, that it was July 3, 1863, and the Battle of Gettysburg.  In the 1700s, it’d have to be July 4, 1776. Then there’s October 12, 1492, the day Christopher Columbus first caught sight of the New World, and June 19, 1215, the day King John signed the Magna Carta, establishing a rule of law and the founding of the rights of free men. Of course, “The Longest Day” is June 6, 1944.  We celebrate it today, June 6, 2014, on its 70th anniversary.  The largest armada in world history got underway early that June day when the English Channel was crossed by ships and planes that carried more than 100,000 American, British and Canadian troops. In a radio broadcast later that day, President Franklin D. Roosevelt announced the invasion against the “unholy forces of our enemy.”  He hoped for a great victory that would result in a seismic shift for the world’s nations toward democratic principles and practices rather than dictatorships. Along with prayers for success, Roosevelt and the Allies knew, after five years of exhausting war, that, if the greatest amphibious operation should fail, it’d be war-exhausted difficult to go back to the drawing board and start over again.  Then, too, the intervening time would enable the Nazis to erect an even more impenetrable Europe and...

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