Month: February 2014

Keizer police officers care

To the Editor: On January 17, my heart stopped and my partner dialed 911. Within minutes she said officers arrived and one officer, Jeffrey Goodman, started performing CPR on me. This officer worked on me for several minutes and would not give up on me. My partner estimates  that my heart was stopped for at least seven minutes to possibly 10 and throughout that time officer Jeffrey Goodman continued with the CPR and with a defibulator until the paramedics arrived to take over. Since that time officer Goodman visited me in the hospital with another officer and brought me flowers just to see how I was doing. Officer Goodman paid me a visit tonight to check up on me yet again. He is a hero as far as my family and myself are concerned and mere words cannot sing his praises or the paramedics who came and relieved him enough. Keizer police officers care and the next time you start to put one down think of my story and take the time to thank and appreciate them for all they do.Thank you officer Jeffrey Goodman, you are my hero! Margaret Whitehouse...

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Post no Bills

To the Editor: A big thank you to Don Vowell for saying what needs to be said about the Bill Post primary campaign for House district 25. In the very wise words of David Byrne,  “This ain’t no party, this ain’t no disco, this ain’t no foolin’ around.” There are any number of elected “public servants” whose qualifications for the job seem to be nothing more than big egos, but we could do better. There is, most thankfully, another candidate in the primary. Barbara Jensen has filed to run against Post and though not as well known—at least not to the devotees of KYKN’s brand of babble—she is a welcome challenger to Post and his Tea Party cheerleaders. As Don Vowell has documented, Post’s views on government, guns and God are well publicized. Let’s hear more from Ms. Jensen before we declare the election over. Martin Doerfler...

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Thank you to those who helped

To the Editor: After playing nine years of baseball at the Keizer Little League fields, I was happy to be able to give back by replacing the roofs on two dugouts as my Eagle Scout project.  This was only possible because of generous donations from Pfeifer Roofing.  Trevor Pfeifer donated all the materials, and had his employee, Dylan Kaiser, work with us all day on the project.  Nick Olsen, owner of Olsen Homes and Renovation, played a key part in securing the donations from Pfeifer Roofing.  I would also like to thank the people who showed up to work on the roofs even though the weather was not forecasted to be sunny, like it was. Taylor Russell Keizer Eagle Scout...

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Gap’s minimum wage move adds twist

By DEBRA J. SAUNDERS On the day that Facebook paid $19 billion for the aptly named WhatsApp, San Francisco’s Gap Inc. announced it would raise its minimum wage for American employees to $9 per hour this year and $10 per hour in 2015. The announcement probably won’t make a dent in the income inequality gap in the Bay Area, but at least it showed some upward movement for low-wage workers outside the Golden State. According to Gap CEO Glenn Murphy, politics had nothing to do with the move. He wrote on the Gap website that it was “a business decision that’s right for” Gap’s brands and a “strategic investment.” Nonetheless, President Barack Obama shrewdly glommed onto the announcement by applauding the retail giant for a decision expected to raise pay for 65,000 employees out of its U.S. workforce of about 90,000. Obama then called on Congress to pass a Democratic measure to raise the minimum wage to $10.10 per hour—“all without requiring a single dollar in new taxes or spending. It’s time to pass that bill and give America a raise.” Ironically, San Francisco has become ground zero in the minimum wage debate, even though the clothing chain’s workers in the city won’t benefit because San Francisco’s  minimum wage already is $10.74 per hour. Elsewhere in California, the state minimum wage will rise to $9 per hour in July...

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Governor has to show us the energy ‘beef’

Those of us hanging around these parts in the mid-1980s who remember the Wendy’s chain of hamburger restaurants’ use of the advertising line “Where’s the beef?” It was used in an effort to put down competitor patty-size.  Later that same year Democratic primary candidate and former Vice President Walter Mondale used the phrase to present his arguments against the proposed policies championed by his rival, Gary Hart.  Hart was, per Mondale, without the “beef” or lacked substance. It occurs to me that the phrase should be dredged up and used again in reference to an “In my Opinion” piece that appeared in The Oregonian on February 21.   Titled Good for our economy and environment, it rails about the Clean Fuels Program in Oregon that was passed by the legislature in 2009 and, according to Governor John Kitzhaber has been “stalled by heavy pressure from the oil industry.” Meanwhile, “our neighbors in British Columbia and California,” the governor reports, “have been reaping the benefits of capital investment and job creation by opening their transportation fuel markets to cleaner-burning fuels.” Kitzhaber argues the case for implementing the fuels program and talks in bureaucratese about what he has directed Oregon state agencies to do.  However, where is the beef?  Everyone of sane mind knows that we want to clean-up the environment as much as possible and to do so requires a diminishing use of fossil fuels and “clean” coal, too.  Nevertheless, why does...

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