Day: June 10, 2013

Volcanoes meet-and-greet Wednesday

The Salem-Keizer Volcanoes are hosting a free meet-and-greet Wednesday, June 12 at at McNary Restaurant & Lounge, 155 McNary Estates Dr. N. Between 4:30 and 6 p.m., members of the Volcanoes roster will be taking photos with fans and signing autographs for free. On Thursday, June 13, all Keizer residents can get into theVolcanoes game with the College All-Stars for $5 with proof of residency such as a driver’s license or utility bill. Gates open at 5:30 for the 6:35...

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“A Dog Walks into a Nursing Home” by Sue Halpern

“A Dog Walks into a Nursing Home” by Sue Halpern c.2013, Riverhead Books $26.95 / $28.50 Canada 320 pages   BOOK REVIEW by TERRI SCHLICHENMEYER They say it can’t be done. You can’t teach an old dog new tricks, they say, but you’ve spent a good amount of time doing it successfully anyhow. Sit, stay, down, you’ve taught ‘em all. It just took patience and love. And in the new book “A Dog Walks into a Nursing Home” by Sue Halpern, it takes patients and love – and sometimes, the teaching role is reversed. Sue Halpern had her work cut out for her. When she decided to train her seven-year-old Labradoodle, Pransky, to be a therapy dog, Halpern knew it would be a challenge. For most of her life, Pransky was a country dog, unaccustomed to leash, used to wide-open romps in the Vermont woods. She understood all kinds of words (including every synonym for “walk”), but teaching her the tasks she needed to know to formally visit the local nursing home wouldn’t be easy. The requirements were overwhelming, but Halpern “soldiered on.” Six weeks after they began, she called County Nursing and Rehabilitation Home. Not long afterward, she went through orientation, agreed to several stipulations and a criminal background check, and Pransky passed the Therapy Dog test. It was official: the Halpern-and-Pransky team was approved to visit County’s...

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Eight vie for council seat

By CRAIG MURPHY Of the Keizertimes Last year, Ken LeDuc was the only person on the ballot for the Keizer City Council position No. 2 seat he won. There are eight people vying to replace him. Monday marked the deadline for applications to replace LeDuc, who abruptly resigned his seat last month. Councilors will hear five-minute presentations from applicants in a meeting next Monday, June 10, starting at 6 p.m. in council chambers at Keizer Civic Center. City Attorney Shannon Johnson said the order of presenters will be determined by names being drawn from a bucket. Though the meeting will be public, presenters are being asked to sit outside council chambers until they speak, to ensure no advantage for those going later. “We can’t force them to sequester themselves, but that would be the request,” Johnson said. The eight being considered are Ronald Bersin, Eamon Bishop, Matt Chappell, Kim Freeman, Roland Herrera, Kevin Hohnbaum, Mark Miedema and Erick Peterson. To read the complete article and other news from around the Keizer area, pick up a copy of the June 7 print edition of Keizertimes, available at stores all around the area. To subscribe to the print edition for just $25 a year, click on the ‘Subscribe Today’ link at the top of the page, call 503-390-1051 or visit our office at 142 Chemawa Road North in...

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Seeing the future: council approves EOA/HNA study

  By CRAIG MURPHY Of the Keizertimes Keizer is one step closer to predicting the future, thanks to action taken Monday. After months of meetings at various levels, members of the Keizer City Council approved the Housing Needs Analysis (HNA) and Economic Opportunities Analysis (EOA) study, despite repeated complaints of faulty numbers being used. Also addressed was the issue of whether land needed for schools in the future would have to be taken out of the city’s Buildable Land Inventory (BLI) of 267 acres set aside for residential properties. Nate Brown, director of Community Development for the city, shared a document from a planning specialist with the Department of Land Conservation and Development (DLCD). “Keizer would have the flexibility to be more proactive in how it would respond to such a situation,” wrote Gordon Howard. “The city could also require the school district, as a condition of a rezoning approval, to demonstrate that the district would not diminish the residential land supply as a result of the rezone.” To read the complete article and other news from around the Keizer area, pick up a copy of the June 7 print edition of Keizertimes, available at stores all around the area. To subscribe to the print edition for just $25 a year, click on the ‘Subscribe Today’ link at the top of the page, call 503-390-1051 or visit our office at...

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