Day: April 12, 2013

Parks Board recommends naming park for Ryan Hill

  By CRAIG MURPHY Of the Keizertimes Several names were suggested Tuesday, but one clearly stood out. Members of the Keizer Parks and Recreation Advisory Board held a public hearing for the naming of the small park at Keizer Station. One suggestion was to honor Marie Dorian, an early area settler who helped many immigrants coming to the Willamette Valley before dying in 1850. There was also a suggestion to honor Jerry and Lisa Walker, who moved the Volcanoes to Keizer in 1997. But unanimous support was given to the idea of naming the park after Pfc. Ryan Hill, a Keizer native and McNary High School graduate killed in the line of duty while serving in Iraq. The U.S. Army soldier was 20 when he lost his life in January 2007. Hill’s mother, Shawna Hill Fenison, tearfully spoke to the Parks Board about the suggestion. “He is the only person from Keizer killed in action,” Shawna said. “The city did an amazing job honoring him. Naming the park after him would be an amazing memorial to him and his service. To read the complete article and other news from around the Keizer area, pick up a copy of the April 12 issue of Keizertimes, available at stores all around the area. To subscribe for just $25 a year, click on the ‘Subscribe Today’ link at the top of the page,...

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All helping all

The beauty of communities is the diversity of options. There are different stores to shop, different parks to play in, different houses of worship to pray in. Communities, of course, are much more than the infrastructure. Communities are nothing withou its people and their pursuits. Those pursuits, be they athletic- or service-oriented, require money. Every pursuit does its best to raise needed money by asking the people they know—friends, neighbors, local businesses—for donations. Keizer is a generous town, but, like modern communities there are many more organizations seeking funds than just 10 years ago. The reality is that an individual or business cannot donate to every cause it is asked to contribute to, even if they wish to do so. Unfortunately some deserving causes may go wanting. In the tranquil days of America in the 1950s many towns had a Community Chest, usually operated by a service club. They would distribute money to various community groups. The United Way took over those duties in most of the country by the 1960s. United Way remains a major distributor of donations to a large number of charities. That leaves a gap for non-charitiable efforts such as raising money to send deserving kids to any number of events. Athletic groups generally find the money they need to attend camps and tournaments. But what about non-athletic efforts—music and theatre related events? Academic events?...

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River Road, Keizer Station: Where’s the problem?

To the Editor: When we hear about the conflicts between River Road businesses and Keizer Station, maybe the differences should be celebrated. After all, are they simply competing against each other, or are they mutually reinforcing the same general outcome? Businesses on River Road are geared towards various goods and services, that apart from normal competition have the same capacity for attracting the public as those out by the freeway. The two locations are vastly different but this does not mean that one will substitute the other. The success of River Road depends on the economy just like Keizer Station. If the general business of Keizer is strong then it will be because of the collective input of a healthy economy both inside and outside of Keizer itself—which is the only thing that really matters. Jobs are important, but so is increasing the tax revenue which lessens the burdens of business by expanding the tax base and adding incentive for growth. In this manner, Keizer Station development will incentivize River Road by freeing up more money and less taxes in the process which should increase spending, or at least minimize the increase in across the board taxes while also stabilizing spending and growth. We are a residential community, which forms the main basis of the broader economics of Keizer. The city’s role is to allow the tax base to...

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The PERS irony

To the Editor: Yes, of course, almost everyone of age has heard of The Perfect Storm movie, the one with George Clooney, Mark Wahlberg, et al, a film based on a real storm that took down to the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean a swordfishing vessel, the Andrea Gail, with all on board lost.  Well, now we’ve got our own perfect “storm” well underway via the Oregon political theatre; here, however, it’s the perfect irony. What’s irony?  It is when there’s an incongruity or discrepancy between the actual result of a sequence of events and the normal or expected result.  Thereby, the word irony perfectly fits what’s been the major thrust of Governor Kitzhaber and a number of members of the Oregon Legislature, building up to and, now, during the 2013 session, fanatically encouraged by some among the Oregon press, mainly in Portland and Salem, and the state’s elite, to take away PERS retirees benefits and set in motion what’s readily predicted to be the first galvanized nail in a soft wood PERS coffin. Most interesting in this state’s most graphic example of irony is that the governor and several legislators are happy as Oregon clams at high tide over granting undocumented immigrants in-state tuition (It’s the votes, stupid!).   Yet, they blind-eye-pretend to ignore the fact that Oregon residents and taxpayers will have to make up the difference to pay the costs to the state’s public colleges and universities, and those taxpayers in this instance are the PERS retirees. if developments in...

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