Day: May 25, 2012

Celt baseball team ignites in first round playoff win

By ERIC A. HOWALD Of the Keizertimes If the McNary High School varsity baseball team was holding back the good stuff during its run through the Central Valley Conference, it surely picked the right time to deploy it. The Celtics squared off with Tualatin High School Monday, May 21, and emerged with a 11-7 win in the first round of the state playoffs. “We’ve been in close situations like that all year and we knew that pitcher, Travis Johnson, was going to be tough, but we kind of kept our heads up,” said senior D.J. Harryman. “It was kind of a vibe where we knew we were going to be all right.” That vibe carried the team through a harrowing first inning that saw two of the Timberwolves knock two hits over the fence and take a 3-0 lead. “When the other team hits two balls out of the park in the bottom of the first, there’s some concern, but, to the kids’ credit, they didn’t panic,” said Larry Keeker, McNary head coach. The McNary team battled back in the second on a two-out, RBI-hit by Chris Burger that closed the gap to 3-1. Pitcher Jon Stong held Tualatin at bay on the mound in the bottom of the inning. In the top of the third, Celt Garren Robinett belted a three-run homer that put the Celts up 4-1....

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Keizer’s history preserved

Anyone who thinks Keizer doesn’t have a history isn’t looking in the right place. But it is not hard to see that the area in which we live is filled with history that dates back 200 years. Many of the stories about the past two centuries of what is now known as Keizer can be found at the Keizer Heritage Museum. A person could be forgiven for, after looking around Keizer, to think we are a relatively new settlement. Our city does not have a downtown filled with buildings dating to the 19th century like other Oregon cities. We do have two buildings in the downtown core that date back to the early 1900s: the Frank Evans house (where Mommy and Maddi’s is located) near the corner of River Road and Dearborn Avenue; and the old Keizer School which found new life as the Keizer Heritage Center (at the civic center campus on Chemawa Road). The first Americans are said to have set up a fur trading post on a bluff overlooking the Willamette River in what is now southeast Keizer.  That was in 1812. After the house/fort/trading post was abandoned there was little activity in our corner of the world until Thomas Dove Keizur and his party rode into the Willamette Valley and settled down where Shari’s Restaurant now sits. Our city’s name comes from our earliest settlers....

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Students celebrated for changing lives

By ERIC A. HOWALD Of the Keizertimes The four Keizer students recognized for making major shift in their approaches to life and school last week with the Turnaround Achievement Award are all very different, but each persevered through challenges that would have sunk someone with less character. McNary High School’s Alex Peters, Blanchet Catholic School’s Michelle Stenson, Claggett Creek Middle School’s Carley Hammond and Whiteaker Middle School’s Tayler Rains were all honored at the annual banquet sponsored by Town & Country Lanes. Alex Peters When Celtic counselor Carrie Brown met Alex Peters four years ago, he told her exactly what he thought of school. “The message he gave us was I don’t want to be here, this place sucks,” Brown said. When his teachers and parents met with him to discuss his lack of effort, nothing much improved. His adoptive father offered him the keys to a 1978 Chevy Suburban if he managed to turn things around, but the family needed to sell the car before Peters got his chance at the keys, but he had a new motivator. He was to become a father himself. “For a long time it was the idea of the car that kept me going, it was a comfort,” Peters said. “Once I had my son, I knew I had to keep up my grades for myself and him.” Peters’ son, Bradlee, is...

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It’s a business first

After 22 years Roth’s Fresh Markets will close their Keizer store on June 26. Roth’s other stores in the region will remain open. The Keizer community will invariably change after Roth’s ceases operations here in town. Founder Orville Roth and his entire company has been a leader in community involvement—sponsoring events and sports teams; donating food to schools. We have yet to see if Roth’s Fresh Markets will retain a semblence of its  high profile good community works. There will be many in Keizer who will lament Roth’s closure. But they must understand that Roth’s is not a philanthropic charity, it is a business. Its primary mission is to make a profit and the Keizer store was not making a profit. As company CEO Mike Roth wrote, the other stores subsidized the Keizer location for years. That was not sustainable. Roth’s Fresh Markets supported Keizer and many of its events, clubs and organizations for years. Unfortunately not enough Keizer shoppers returned the favor. Fortunately there are other Roth’s stores to patronize. This is a cautionary tale about community involvement and business—every business needs to make a profit first, otherwise it can’t help...

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