Day: April 13, 2012

Pencils, no brushes

People who love art, people who like art and people who are indifferent to art, will all find something to marvel at when they visit 21st Colored Pencil Exhbit at the Enid Joy Mount Gallery at the Keizer Heritage Center. Colored pencils?  Don’t dismiss it out of hand. The 51 pieces being shown during the show, which runs through the end of April, exhibit great artistic skill and ability. Visitors to the gallery will be awestruck by the light, shadows and detail that is part and parcel of just about every piece. Winner of Best of Show was Dan the Man, a large portrait drawn by C.J. Morlein of Beaverton. Those of use who can barely draw a straight line will try to wrap our minds around how an effect was achieved. Using a colored pencil, something we all used in grade school, is different than using a paint brush. Just as any art exhibit there are various levels of accomplishment at the Colored Pencil show.  Calm Zzzs, by Pat Averill, is a masterwork of an ocean scene.  How does she create the realistic waves, one might ask? The Colored Pencil Exhibition is one of the finest shows the Keizer Art Association has ever shown at the gallery. For artists of an level it is well worth a visit to the Keizer Heritage Center to be inspired by the...

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No way to run a government

A Box of Soap By DON VOWELL Mitt Romney lost the 1994 Massachusetts Senate election to Ted Kennedy, in part because Sen. Kennedy successfully painted Romney as a heartless businessman more interested in profit than in the welfare of employees.  He will face the same charges between now and November. The most memorable story is about American Pad and Paper Co. or, AmPad.  AmPad’s most familiar product is those yellow legal pads you can find anywhere.  AmPad was a healthy business when Bain Capital, held up as the primary example of Mitt Romney’s business savvy, bought it in 1992.  The idea was for Bain Capital to make the business bigger, more efficient, and then sell it for a handsome profit. For an initial investment of $5 million Bain had taken $102 million in profit by the year 2000.  They took $2 million a year in management fees, and collected millions in acquisition fees every time AmPad bought another company with the aim of expanding their product line.  Bain then made tens of millions from going public with AmPad in the 1996 IPO stock sale.   What did AmPad gain from all this Bain wizardry?  In the year 2000, AmPad filed for bankruptcy. Bain Capital did nothing illegal.  A private equity company works on the same principle as someone “flipping” houses.  They buy a small and humble company, make some...

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Dressing up? How embarrassing

When I was in high school, there was a good-looking senior named Juan who was friends, it seemed, with everybody.  Juan unfailingly used every Friday of the school year as an excuse to dress up.  He looked snappy on Mondays through Thursdays as well, but on Fridays, Juan sauntered into the cafeteria in his tie and three-piece suit, stopping at each group of tightly-knit teens and greeting his many friends among them.  We all joked that he had a future in car sales or as President. Juan’s Friday habit was unique in its reliability but not in itself: in those days (and we’re not talking decades ago, thank you very much), students dressed up for a variety of reasons.  Skirts, slacks, and heels were not necessarily an indicator of a formal, after-school obligation, nor were they indicative of one’s wealth or social status.  In fact, two of my most embarrassing high school moments—one the standard trip-and-fall; the other, an incident involving my skirt tucked into the rear of my nylons for quite some time—occurred when I was dressed to the nines for no particular reason. But trends are different now.  When my husband, a health teacher, required that some of his students dress nicely (definition: no holey jeans) for a class event, he was met with whines, complaints, outright refusal, and an irritable parent e-mail.  The day of the...

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Credit Prothero for expanded library

To the Editor: Thanks for the information and recognition provided in your editorial (They made a library, April 6) about the Keizer Community Library. I would remind you that much of the planning and actions taken related to expansion of the library resulted from the efforts of the present library director, Steve Prothero.  His contribution should be recognized. Art Burr...

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What is wrong with high gas prices?

To the Editor: High gas prices are not a singular issue. Even if it was, that in itself would severely hurt family budgets. The government and media speak about gas prices as if it is unrelated to anything else. The problem is higher gas prices in an economy with petroleum at its foundation affects almost everything else. It all begins with transportation. The food you buy, the trips you take to schools, doctors and leisure, items you order, travel, vacations, clothes, getting to work, shipping, shopping dining out, visiting and energy use. High oil prices affect police, fire and emergency response budgets. Oil has moved this nation and economy for over 100 years and it is the reason we have the world’s largest economy. When oil prices go up, it immediately affects budgets and inflationary prices. The government in its wisdom and downright deceit removed food and energy prices from the Inflationary Index. Without that, the government can say “inflation is low.” Gas at the pumps is up about 90 percent but they say nothing about the inflation that affects the entire economy. It is simply government deceit and an outright lie to the public. This nonsense must not be tolerated any more. If you like living with tight and shrinking budgets for all aspects of society, then you have the government you deserve. If not, be heard at...

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