Month: January 2012

“Girl Hunter: Revolutionizing the Way We Eat, One Hunt at a Time” by Georgia Pellegrini

“Girl Hunter: Revolutionizing the Way We Eat, One Hunt at a Time” by Georgia Pellegrini c.2012, Da Capo LifeLong $24.00 / $28.00 Canada 248 pages, includes index By TERRI SCHLICHENMEYER Dinner last night was delicious. The salad was crispy and fresh, with all the right additions and your favorite dressing. There was the slightest tease of a comfort-food memory from the main dish, which was created with a mini-bite of spice nipping your tongue. And the side dishes? You had seconds of those, followed by dessert that must’ve been made by angels. So where did it all come from?  To say “a restaurant” or “the grocery store” is cheating, especially after you’ve read “Girl Hunter” by Georgia Pellegrini. One day not long ago, after looking up from the trading floor of a Wall Street firm and wondering how she got there, Georgia Pellegrini suddenly knew that a life in finance was not where she belonged. Determined to “nourish [her] soul again,” she set out to become a chef. Still, there was something missing. She was working at a high-end restaurant, serving the same people she had formerly toiled beside, but pretension marred her job, presentation was more important than nutrition, and food was being wasted. Then the head chef gave her an “unusual order:” she was told to slaughter five turkeys for the evening’s dinner. The experience opened her...

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Library closing until February 13

The Keizer Community Library will nearly double in size and expand hours as part of upcoming changes at the Keizer Heritage Center. In the meantime the library is closed until Monday, February 13. Upon reopening the library will be open on selected evenings and Sundays for the first time. New hours will be as follows: • Mondays 1 p.m. – 8 p.m. • Tuesday-Thursday 1 p.m. – 7 p.m. • Fridays 1 p.m. – 4 p.m. • Saturdays 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. • Sundays 1 p.m. – 4 p.m. Library Director Steve Prothero said the all-volunteer library has grown to the point that it’s bursting at the seams: Not enough room for their books, too little space for public Internet access, no comfortable places to sit, no ideal place for children to relax and learn. It relies solely on membership dues and other donations to survive; its modest stipend from the City of Keizer was eliminated several years ago in a round of budget cuts. In the move their space will double from 625 square feet to about 1,350. The library will expand into the area where the Keizer Heritage Museum is, and the museum will move elsewhere in the building. “We get lots of donations, and we can’t shelve everything we would like to shelf,” Prothero said. “There’s no space here.” The strategy so far has been to...

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Gym faces investigation by Ore. Dept. of Justice

By JASON COX Of the Keizertimes The Oregon Department of Justice is investigating a Keizer gym that closed abruptly in December of last year, leaving members wondering where their membership dues went. Corey Ahrens, the gym’s owner, told the Keizertimes then that his customers would have their memberships transferred to another gym – which state law allows him to do so long as it happens promptly. But the customers we spoke with said that offer never materialized, and the company Ahrens told us would be transferring memberships told us a different story. He told the Keizertimes then he made the decision to close on December 22, and had been selling memberships up until then. “We are a third-party company. We have no affiliation with (Platinum Sports and Fitness) whatsoever,” said a representative from All-State Financial Group, who declined to give her name. The firm provides membership services to gyms, including Platinum. Ahrens declined to answer specific questions by email, saying “you guys took what I said last time and twisted my words to make your story better. “I took over a business that was going bankrupt,” Ahrens said. “I tried to live the American dream and own my own business in the worse [sic] economy we’ve seen in a very long time. Business [sic] across america closing daily and going bankrupt. I tried to stay open for as long...

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The difference: Sweat, preparation and luck spared city from floodwaters

By JASON COX Of the Keizertimes When the river and Keizer creeks start to rise, comparisons to floods of yore inevitably float to the surface. The most common frame of reference was the 1996 floods. An orderly evacuation preceded flooding in McNary Estates and a surprise rise in Labish Creek in the Country Glen and Hidden Creek neighborhoods. Labish would rise again the next winter, flooding several homes. Rain levels now and in 1996 were fairly similar. So what spared Keizer from the floodwaters this time? A combination of preparation, perspiration and plain luck. Mother Nature lent a hand, with well-timed breaks in the rain. Downpours tended to be extremely localized, unlike the widespread rains of 1996. The snow pack didn’t compare to 1996, when as much as a foot of the white stuff sat below Detroit Dam, and thus rivers were already at an elevated state when rain drenched the valley for days and days in February 1996. But preparation showed positive results in 1996, and lessons learned since then may well have spared homes along local waterways from further damage. The Willamette River reaches major flood stage at 32 feet; in 1996 it rose to 35 feet. In 1996, much of west Keizer was saved from the river’s wrath by an earthen dike standing where the river wall is now – starting at Cummings Lane north to...

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Bob & Pam Zielinski named Keizer First Citizens

Longtime local benefactors Bob and Pam Zielinski were honored as Keizer’s First Citizens at a banquet Saturday night. Also recognized were: – Audrey Butler, Mary Kay, Merchant of the Year – Kim Phillips, McNary High swim coach, Service to Education Award – Al and Anne Rasmus, Keizer Heritage Center, President’s Award The Keizer Chamber of Commerce gives out the awards at its annual...

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