Day: December 2, 2011

State champ choir offering Carol-A-Grams

Members of the McNary High School choirs are hoping to sing for your suppers, and business parties, and holiday gatherings this month. The program is offering Carol-A-Grams between Friday, Dec. 16 and Thursday, Dec. 22. A $35 contribution will bring a three-song performance to your doorstep and a $50 contribution will buy five songs. Each Carol-A-Gram features eight singers from the Celtic choir program. Students are available at any time during the week-long fundraising drive. “Part of the money will help us pay for upcoming trips to compete and the other part goes to a local family with a child facing kidney failure,” said Jacob Cordie, a McNary senior and an organizer of the effort. To reserve a Carol-A-Gram time, call Cordie at...

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Bunco tourney supports cancer research efforts

Play for a Cure is sponsoring a Bunco for Boobies tournament Friday, Dec. 9, at Knights of Columbus Hall, 725 Shipping Street N.E., in Salem. Tickets are $20 per person or $15 for cancer survivors. Bunco is an easy-to-learn dice game and no prior experience is necessary. Tickets are available by calling Stephanie Nelke, 503-400-2280. Businesses interested in donating prizes for the event can also contact...

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Court upholds LUBA’s Area C decision; city must reconsider development

By JASON COX Of the Keizertimes The Oregon Court of Appeals upheld the state land use board’s ruling that the city must reconsider its decision allowing the next phase of Keizer Station. The decision from the Land Use Board of Appeals was affirmed without opinion on Wednesday, November 30. It may well further delay a project likely to include Walmart along with possible offices and apartments. It’s come to be known as Area C. The Keizer City Council will have to reconsider the issue with the guidelines LUBA referees outlined in its decision from earlier this year. Appeal options for the city and developers were not immediately clear. One root of LUBA’s decision harkens back to a council decision made in early 2008, when councilors modified the mixed use section of city development code to allow a store larger than 10,000 square feet; indeed, stores up to 120,000 square feet were allowed after the change. Councilors required that a store bigger than 80,000 square feet could be built only with a corresponding amount of mixed use structures; those could be anything from office space to retail to apartments. But LUBA referees ruled a condition councilors later approved – one that required construction only begin on surrounding buildings before the large-format store can open – contradicts the intent the same body wrote into the code in 2008. The decision also...

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S-K Budget committee tries to balance waning resources, student progress

By HERB SWETT For the Keizertimes Struggles with scarce resources and student performance in the face of those problems were discussed at Tuesday’s meeting of the Salem-Keizer School District budget committee. The question of double counting came up early in the meeting. Mike Wolfe, assistant superintendent, said the administration was avoiding it. Noting that dollars move from the general fund to the general services fund and the debt services fund, he said, “We’re tracking the movement of that dollar.” Directors of the elementary, middle and high schools pointed out progress in their students’ performance but noted that improvements were still needed in some areas. Ron Speck, one of the elementary directors, said that reading and mathematics scores in his schools have been rising in the last five years but that there have been “flat lines” in writing and science. Meera Kreitzer, the other elementary director, noted that the district’s strategic plan has provided a data warehouse that principals and teachers have been using effectively. Melissa Cole, middle school director, reported consistent progress in the schools, with the priority of making sure students graduate. “They’re full of hope, confidence and dreams,” she said of her students, noting that on average they were outperforming students in Oregon as a whole. Kelly Carlisle, high school director, began by stating his vision: “All students graduate and are prepared for a successful life.” He...

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