Day: March 4, 2011

Unintended Consequences

To the Editor: I am grateful that the citizenry has the opportunity to bring initiatives to a public vote. I am impressed with the organizing ability of the Keep Keizer Livable (KKL) folks. KKL may not be what they appear to be. Their activity level and advertising is a testimony to the power of organized labor. I was disappointed to learn that of the $29,175.07 contributed to KKL, $26,000 came from various unions and organized labor groups, $2,200 came from Roth’s, and only $975.07 came from individuals. Based on the funding sources, I wonder if KKL represents the people of Keizer or organized labor. I am also disappointed in the language of the initiative. A “Yes” vote would be short-sighted and have unintended consequences. The initiative would limit buildings over 65,000 square feet. As a point of reference, the Keizer Civic Center is only 67,000 square feet. We need to consider the long-term effects of the initiative. The measure would effectively eliminate the prospect of having a Fred Meyer, Costco, REI, IKEA, Cabela’s or other large retailer come to town in the future. Once the law is on the books, it will be very difficult to remove. Any large retailer will automatically eliminate Keizer as a potential business site during an initial site selection process. With neither Woodburn nor Salem having the 65,000 square foot restriction, why would a...

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24-314 good for local Keizer businesses

To the Editor: At the last Keizer City Council meeting on Feb. 22, several people asked the question: with a big box grocery store in Area C of Keizer Station, what will be the impact on the current Keizer businesses? The room was quiet with no answer from any of the council members or staff.  It seems the council has turned into an oligarchy. Well, I have an answer.  A big box Walmart will destroy much of River Road businesses. Kenneth E. Stone, professor of economics at Iowa State University, describes a community’s retail market as a pie. He says, “In this situation when a large, well-known retail store enters a town, it captures a significant slice of the pie, thus leaving less sales for the other businesses.” In Maine existing business lost over 10 percent of their market in 80 percent of towns where big box stores opened. Studies show that over the course of a few years, after a big box store enters a community, retailers’ sales of apparel drops 28 percent on average, hardware and building material sales fall by 20 percent and sales of speciality stores fall by 17 percent. Spending $100 at one of the neighborhood’s independent businesses creates $68 in additional local economic activity while spending $100 at a chain produces only $43 worth of local impact. And finally, because their owners live...

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Vote no on 24-314

To the Editor: In regard to the “big box” situation: I wonder if Keizer stores need some competition, as some of their prices have been too high. With the economic situation, it only makes sense to patronize the stores with the cheaper prices.  Also, the “big boxes” have more of a variety. I am sure the “big box” would bring in more business, plus jobs. Vote no on the ballot which states “I do not want to prohibit the big box stores from coming to Keizer.” Earl Nelson...

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Council’s decision on big box application

To the Editor: The Keizer City Council will be faced with one of the most important decisions that has confronted both the council and community members in Keizer for many years. On Monday, March 7th the council will vote on the application of a 116,000 square foot retail store in Area C of Keizer Station. Prior to the decision on this application, I would like the Keizer City Council to carefully analyze the following issues: 1. Does the current traffic analysis data address credibly reflect the impact of an additional 4-7,000 cars on Lockhaven Drive, and especially Chemawa Road? If the intersection of Verda Lane and Chemawa Rd. is currently failing during peak driving time, will the same thing occur on all of the intersections on these two streets? What will the 24 hour traffic impact be on these streets with the additional trips generated from a large retail store in Area C of Keizer Station? 2. Has the city council taken the time to have an economic impact study completed on River Road in Keizer? If a big box retailer/grocery outlet is built in Area C of Keizer Station, what will happen to Roth’s, Albertsons, Safeway, Rite Aid, Walgreens, True Value Hardware and many other businesses on River Road? When Walmart was built in Woodburn and Lebanon, Roth’s Markets went out of business in both cities. The business...

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Lady Celts take tourney title, No. 1 CVC seed in playoffs

By ERIC A. HOWALD Of the Keizertimes The third time was the charm for the Lady Celts varsity basketball team. McNary won the first-ever Central Valley Conference tournament title in a 48-43 win over the West Salem Titans Wednesday, Feb. 23. It was the third meeting of the teams this season and the Titans escaped with wins in the first two. “I’m proud of our composure down the stretch and we kept answering back each time they made a surge,” said Molly Gehley, McNary head coach. Members of the team said the change in the outcome was a result of less stress and a generally more mature team. “I think we were more confident without the stress that we had in the first two games.,” said Celt Keri Stein. “We had a hard time with their press in the first two games, but this time we got through their press like three times in a row,” added Teresa Peterson. The game was tied at 19 going into the half, but strong offense offensive and defensive efforts in the third period put the Celts ahead and they held on for the win. Celt Deven Hunter put in a 21-point game leading to the Celtic victory. Averi Wing contributed 11 points, Teresa Peterson put up eight, Stacey Titchenal and Jessica Darras put up four each. “We had the passion to come...

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