Day: October 29, 2010

Candle triggers Keizer house fire

A fire ignited by an unattended candle scorched a Keizer bedroom Thursday, Oct. 28, and caused approximately $2,000 in damages. Firefighters responded to a single family home at 4686 Rivercrest Drive N., where a caller reported hearing popping noises and seeing smoke was coming from the furnace vents.  Upon arrival fire fighters saw light smoke inside the residence. While searching the home, they located the fire in a bedroom. The fire was quickly extinguished and the closed bedroom door  minimized the spread of smoke. The fire caused damage to the room and contents. One individual who was home at the time of the fire was transported to Salem Hospital suffering from smoke inhalation. A total of one engine, two ambulances, one duty officer and thirteen firefighters responded to the scene. The Keizer Fire District reminds area residents to take care when using candles, and offered the following tips: • Nearly half of all candle fires start in the bedroom. Do not use candles in the bedroom. • Always keep candles clear of flammable material or liquids. A good rule is to allow at least three feet from anything that can burn. • Keep candles out of drafts that blow flames towards flammable materials. • Always use stable and secure candle holders. • Never leave candles unattended, for even short periods of time. • Extinguish candles with care. Do not allow...

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Schrader talk at Rotary all business

At the tail end of the political season, Rep. Kurt Schrader’s talk at Keizer Rotary Club Thursday, Oct. 28, was all business. A member of the Small Business Committee, the Canby-based Democrat discussed bills affecting small businesspeople, saying several changes could help them obtain credit and increase tax write-offs. He said the “credit issue is a big deal” from what he’s been told by small business owners, and noted loan opportunities where 90 percent would be guaranteed by the Small Business Administration. He also said the SBA was assisting refinances of commercial real estate up to $5 million. Schrader also cited a small business lending fund targeted at small, community banks with assets totaling less than $10 billion. He added businesses seeking loans would be required to submit a business plan. “We learned a little something from that TARP (Troubled Assets Relief Program) fiasco,” which was largely aimed at larger financial institutions, Schrader said. He also said recent changes would make the self-employment health care premiums 100 percent tax deductible, and said some businesses with payrolls averaging $25,000 – $40,000 per employee could qualify for a 35 percent deduction on employer-provided health care. Asked about extension of the Bush-era tax cuts, Schrader said he didn’t know if cuts for those making more than $250,000 would pass or not, but said extending the reductions for those making less than that...

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Keep Heritage as it is

The city and the Keizer Heritage Foundation are headed for a collision unless they can come to an agreement on the foundation’s lease of the ground its building—the Keizer Heritage Center—sits on. The Heritage Foundation raised money in the late 1980s to save the original Keizer School.  After the construction of Schoolhouse Square Shopping Center, the building sat forlorned behind the center.  The community came together and raised money—from pennies to sizable donations— with help from the city to relocate the building its to present site and to rehabilitate the structure into a community center. The center is the city’s only historic building that serves a public service. If the current lease is not renewed the city can take over control of the heritage building.  That would be a troubling chain of events if it came to pass. If the city did take control of the building one wonders how they would pay for its operation and maintenance.  The Keizer Heritage Foundation has used revenues from tenant rents and rental of the conference room to pay for day-to-day operations as well as adding money to the sinking fund that pays for big maintenance projects. Some officials seek larger space for the Keizer Museum; others want more space for the Keizer Community Library.  Those are nifty goals but to reach them a lot of different pieces have to fall into...

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The good that fluoridation does

By LADY-JEAN STRATFORD, DMD and BRIAN GILMORE, DDS Fluoridation of community water supplies is the single most effective public health measure to prevent tooth decay. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention proclaimed community water fluoridation as one of the 10 great public health achievements of the 20th century. Fluoride in our water benefits everyone, especially those without access to regular dental care. It is the most efficient way to prevent one of the most common childhood diseases, tooth decay, which is five times as common as asthma in five to 17 year olds. Adding fluoride to drinking water is like the addition of vitamin D to milk and iodine to table salt. There is absolutely no legitimate scientific study or research that shows that there are any harmful effects from fluoride in our drinking water when it is in the correct concentration, 1.0 ppm (parts per million). More than 65 years of research and practical experience consistently shows that fluoridation of community water is safe. In dentistry we see the positive effects of fluoride in our water on a daily basis. When volunteering in communities and countries with no fluoride in the water, twice the prevalence of cavities and dental disease is painfully obvious. The American Dental Association, the U.S. Public Health Service, the American Medical Association, and the World Health Organization support fluoridation of community water supplies....

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Volunteers look forward to ‘Extreme Makeover’ on TV

By ERIC A. HOWALD Of the Keizertimes If there is such a thing as fate, maybe its fickle finger led Jon Gehm back to Salem just in time to lend a hand at the Oregon School for the Deaf Extreme Makeover: Home Edition build. Gehm graduated from the school in 1970, but left the area for decades to pursue his calling as a traveling evangelist for Deaf Ministries Worldwide. “I moved back because my children decided to move back and I arrived on Aug. 27,” said Gehm, who set down stakes in Keizer. It was mere days before OSD was announced as the build site. Of the many volunteers at the site, Gehm was one of the several deaf volunteers who found ways to chip in during the build. For Gehm and his son Daniel, who acted as interpreter during the interview, helping out meant mostly cleaning up the site as debris piled up during the whirlwind construction schedule, but he also got to hang doors with as part of the work crew. “I didn’t think it could be done in one week,” Gehm said. “But what they did there was wonderful and awesome.” Marion Rich, another deaf volunteer and Keizer resident, also pitched in cleaning up the site. Rich was present at the picnic with her brother, a teacher at OSD, and partner who works there as well,...

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