Day: October 19, 2010

For Keizer-based emergency training program, reminders to start small in Peru are ever-present

By ERIC A. HOWALD Of the Keizertimes For those fortunate enough to live in a First World country, the easiest way to deal with a bug infestation is to call an exterminator. One of the more common methods for dealing with the same problem in a less prosperous nation is to set a fire. In the middle of the living room. “On our way to a training, we came across a a two-story brick home and smoke roiling out of the upstairs windows,” said Don Davis, chief executive officer of Global Mission Readiness (GMR), a Keizer-based program providing training to emergency response and rescue organizations. “We could hear the crackling of the fire outside the house. We ran up to the house and started knocking on the door, when we didn’t get a response, we boosted one of the guys up to the second-floor window to take a look. He got down and said there was a fire in the middle of the room.” The group members started pounding on the door and heard some shuffling from inside. A woman opened the door and began yelling at them, asking what they were doing. When they responded through an interpreter that her house was on fire, the response wasn’t the expected one. “She said, ‘No, I set that on purpose.’ She was trying to smoke the bugs out,” Davis said....

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For Keizer-based emergency training program, reminders to start small in Peru are ever-present

By ERIC A. HOWALD Of the Keizertimes For those fortunate enough to live in a First World country, the easiest way to deal with a bug infestation is to call an exterminator. One of the more common methods for dealing with the same problem in a less prosperous nation is to set a fire. In the middle of the living room. “On our way to a training, we came across a a two-story brick home and smoke roiling out of the upstairs windows,” said Don Davis, chief executive officer of Global Mission Readiness (GMR), a Keizer-based program providing training to emergency response and rescue organizations. “We could hear the crackling of the fire outside the house. We ran up to the house and started knocking on the door, when we didn’t get a response, we boosted one of the guys up to the second-floor window to take a look. He got down and said there was a fire in the middle of the room.” The group members started pounding on the door and heard some shuffling from inside. A woman opened the door and began yelling at them, asking what they were doing. When they responded through an interpreter that her house was on fire, the response wasn’t the expected one. “She said, ‘No, I set that on purpose.’ She was trying to smoke the bugs out,” Davis said....

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Lady Celt silence leads to 7-0 loss

By ERIC A. HOWALD Of the Keizertimes When the McNary girls varsity soccer remained silent after taking the field against McKay last week, the Royal Scots filled the vacuum with the sound of the ball hitting the back of the net. The Lady Celts were trounced 7-0. “I don’t know if we weren’t communicating or it just wasn’t our day, but we hit the field and we were dead quiet,” said Danielle Lovejoy, a McNary forward. The lack of communication created jams on the Celtic side of the ball and openings for McKay. “We didn’t stay on our marks very well,” said Stacey Titchenal. “Three of us would go after one person rather than staying with our marks and that was a big part of it.” The team was still struggling to adapt with the loss of sweeper Hailey Scoggins, said Laura Donaldson. “We’re still trying to figure out our new formation now that it’s been switched up,” she said. The Celts made three shots on goal during the game to no avail, but putting the ball in the back of the net is going to be essential in the second half of the season, said Miguel Camarena, Celtic head coach. “When you allow a goal in the first four minutes of the game, everything changes,” Camarena said of the West Salem game. “We knew that we needed to...

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Japanese influence in Keizer area could be recognized by group

By JASON COX Of the Keizertimes A project commemorating the Japanese influence in the Keizer area could be on tap. Proponents had in mind a kiosk at Keizer Station Park similar to one opened for Marie Dorian earlier this year. The Keizer Points of Interest committee sought and got the support of the Parks and Recreation Board Tuesday night. Bob Stai said the project would get assistance from the Fukuda family, who had a farm in the early 20th century in the Lake Labish area. There they raised onions and, as it turns out, a particularly compelling breed of celery. “We take pride in our filberts and our cherries, but they were able to cultivate two different kinds of celery and have two crops in one season,” Stai said. Family patriarch Roy Fukuda created the “Golden Plume” variety, according to the Oregon Historical Society Museum, that was “a trait considered very desirable at the time.” Stai said Sen. Charles McNary of Keizer took some to then-President Calvin Cooldige, who sent a thank-you note to the Fukuda family. “It’s kind of exciting for us in that I’ve been living in Keizer and a resident of Oregon for many years, and I didn’t have an appreciation or even an understanding of the influence Japanese-Americans have brought to our community,” Stai said. “… It was not taught to us in school.” World...

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