Day: September 3, 2010

Hot air balloon makes unexpected landing on city street

A hot-air balloon made an unexpected landing in a Keizer neighborhood Friday morning. The balloon, passengers in tow, landed in the 500 block of Menlo Drive just about 8 a.m. Friday, Sept. 3. No one appeared to be injured. “We just ran out of wind and it was time to put it down,” said Jim Desch of Balloon Flying Service of Oregon. “So we did. We had no wind. Absolutely no wind at all.” Desch called the event “a landing of convenience.” They had launched from Westgate Assembly of God Church in west Salem. “It’s a standard launch site,” Desch said. “We use it all the time. But this is not a standard living. We’ve landed on city streets before several times … we just flat didn’t have any...

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IN THE RING: Do recent revelations about egg safety hurt your confidence in our food inspection system?

Each week the Keizertimes asks a question about current events.  To see more of this week’s answers or answers to past questions log onto www.keizertimes.com and click on In the Ring. This week’s question: Do recent revelations about egg safety hurt your confidence in our food inspection system? And what precautions, if any, do you and your family take? James Wilhite and Pat Erhlich, Gubser Neighborhood Assn.— No – it did not change our confidence, or lack thereof in the confidence in the food inspection system in this country. The food safety in this country depends largely on the integrity of the producer and how they perceive good safety practice and food recalls will affect their bottom line.  Good conscientious folks will take the steps necessary to produce safe quality food for their countrymen, even if it adds to the cost. Food safety laws and regulations are probably adequate for the most part in this country but the regulating agencies of the government, Federal or State are always understaffed and probably kept that way on purpose by vested interests. As for precautions we try to handle all our food with care, wash our hands, be aware of possible contamination, and use safe cooking practice.  When a recall comes about, we try and find out the products affected. Roy Duncan, retired Oregon state analyist— About the only things the federal...

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A ban on big box stores

By KEVIN HOHNBAUM A little over two years ago, Keizer City Council changed the development code in Keizer to allow large format stores anywhere in Keizer that is zoned for mixed use.  This change was made in spite of many hundreds of Keizer citizens testifying, writing letters, signing petitions and speaking out opposed to the change. A local citizens group, Keep Keizer Livable, disagrees with the concept that big box retailers can co-exist side by side with neighborhoods and has proposed the an initiative that would limit retail buildings to no more than 65,000 square feet unless it is in Area A of Keizer Station. The intention of the proposed change is not to eliminate the ability of retailers to locate in Keizer but to limit their ability to negatively impact our neighborhoods and roads.  Area A of Keizer Station is the appropriate place for big box stores.  There is no impact on neighborhoods and traffic stays focused within a contained area in which road patterns have already been created to accommodate the increase in cars. We need to protect and enhance our local businesses.  The change in development code made two years ago allows a big box store to be built not only in areas zoned mixed use but also on land that is currently vacant or as part of a redevelopment project on River Road. According to...

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Let merits be heard

To the Editor: I must protest because Cathy Clark, despite her prestigious position as a Keizer city councilor, is out of order.  I refer to “A big box ban has consequences” (Keizertimes, Aug. 27). To use Robert’s Rules of Order as a metaphor, what she is doing is asking that no citizen second the motion to consider big box store options.  According to the rules there can be no discussion of a motion until it has received a second and isn’t that what we have here?  Some local residents want the public to consider changes before council changes become a fait accompli and they are asking for our second to consider it publicly. My point is that the time to discuss an initiative’s merit is after it has been accepted as an issue for the voters, after it has met the requirement of a certain number of signatures by registered voters.  To argue the merits of an issue before it even qualifies for a vote is, in my opinion, the same as trying to stifle public opinion.  Anyone that signs the petition at this point is saying, ‘Hey community, let’s talk publicly about the pros and cons, then vote.  Let’s vote on the issue, not whether to talk about the issue.’ Roy Duncan...

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