Day: July 23, 2010

The safety issue of CFL bulbs

By BARBARA BIGHAM The new compact fluorescent lamps (CFL) cannot be put in with the garbage and disposing of them is a real hassle. But that’s not the main problem—it’s the safety issues that bother me. CFL bulbs contain mercury, a powerful neurotoxin which poses serious health risks, especially for children. Already, researchers have linked mercury toxicity to birth defects, autism, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s Disease, multiple sclerosis, fibromyalgia, lupus, chronic fatigue syndrome, arthritis, depression, bipolar disorder and other conditions. Studies by the Maine  Department of Environmental Protection and Brown University in 2008 found that the amount of mercury released by a single broken CFL bulb greatly exceeds EPA safety standards The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences website notes: “Today’s CFLs underscore mercury’s volatile vapor form, which is still a significant health concern — ventilation reduces but does not eliminate this toxicant. Mercury vapor inhalation can cause significant neural damage in developing fetuses and children.” According to the EPA, if a bulb breaks in your home you need to quickly evacuate children and pets from the area. Then, ventilate the room for 15 minutes, shut off the central forced-air heating/air conditioning system to keep the fumes from circulating through the house, carefully scoop up the pieces with cardboard or duct tape, and place them in a glass jar with metal lid (such as a canning jar) or in a sealed...

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Where city councilors come from

By CATHY CLARK Serving as a Keizer  city councilor has been an extraordinary journey. I have met kind, creative, generous neighbors along the way, worked with a great team of similarly dedicated volunteers, and studied diligently to be prepared for the vast array of issues I am called on to handle. Local government is a different animal than state and federal institutions. Here is where we as neighbors work together to identify and meet our needs, set goals, and partner with other jurisdictions and agencies to benefit our entire community and region. My work has not been defined by the narrow label of a political organization. And because we are not sorted by political affiliation, zones, or neighborhoods, we each represent the interests of all of Keizer.  By collaboration, conversation, and consensus to determine our direction, we get results: better streets and sidewalks, safer neighborhoods, vibrant parks, clean water, healthier environment, and more. The decision to run for city council is not to be made lightly. I could not do this without the full support and understanding of my family. Unlike state and federal offices, this is a volunteer position and costs my family and me time, money and resources. I believe the personal costs are worth it because, rather than being a thankless drudgery, I find my service to be highly fulfilling. Meeting new challenges stretches me as...

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Youths gain added incentive when conservation efforts are close to home

By LANCE MASTERSON Of the Keizertimes Charles Goodenow won’t have to travel far to see the fruits of his physical labor. The 19-year-old is an OutDoor Oregon crew member, and he helped clear the trail at Keizer Rapids Park of blackberries, English ivy, stinging nettle and other irritants, many of which also fall in the invasive species category. Goodenow wasn’t alone in this effort. He was joined by nine other crew members and two crew leaders. But he was the only one from Keizer and he is very familiar with the layout of the park. This sense of community provided him with added incentive. “It’s really heart-warming,” he said of the effort. “My family comes here a lot with our animals, so it makes me feel good to be able to clean up the environment of the area where I’m living.” OutDoor Oregon specializes in conservation. It is part of Northwest Youth Corps (NYC), the program that takes crews into the Pacific Northwest back country five months at a time to repair trails or do other projects. Crew leader Rachel Lauriat came to OutDoor Oregon from NYC. “This is a newer program; it’s more of an urban conversation program,” said Lauriat. “Most of my experience is leading crews in the back country of Washington, Idaho, Oregon and northern California … doing more back country living and more back country...

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Waiting comes before confirmation

By LANCE MASTERSON Of the Keizertimes The only thing Col. Dan Hokanson can do now is wait … at least when it comes to his promotion to brigadier general. Hokanson, the 47-year-old former Keizer resident who was nominated for brigadier general by Major Gen. Raymond Rees, needs presidential approval before any promotion is finalized. But first Hokanson and the other nominees for promotion must gain Senate confirmation. A list of nominees from different branches of the military was submitted to a Senate subcommittee. Qualifications for each nominee are being reviewed and concerns resolved before the list is sent to President Barack Obama for his signature. At this point, the president’s signature is considered a formality. “It could happen any day now, or it could take months. It’s hard to say,” said Hokanson of the process. “The process is lengthy and unpredictable, but generally it can take anywhere from seven months to more than two years.” Rees’ nomination came as Hokanson ended his tenure as commander of the 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team of the Oregon National Guard. The brigade has a long history including the longest deployment of any division during World War II, and recently returned from a year-long deployment in Iraq. Hokanson’s combat deployments include: Operation Just Cause, Operation Enduring Freedom, and Operation Iraqi Freedom. He served in both Iraq and Afghanistan. “I feel fortunate to have...

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New beauty school is family affair

By JASON COX Of the Keizertimes Three local ladies – two sisters and their mother – have teamed up to open a beauty academy here in Keizer. Tangled Ends Hair Academy hosts a ribbon cutting at 4:30 p.m. Friday, July 23, at its location at 136 Chemawa Road N. [MAP: 1] The school will offer certifications in hair design and aesthetics, which includes facials and wraps. Naturally, the ladies behind the school are no stranger to the salon industry. Melissa Mason started Salon 124 in 2001, and sold it to her sister, Hope Stoltz, and a business partner several years ago. Mason, Stoltz and their mother, Prajedes Martinez, own the school. Registration starts now, and school for the first class starts in September. The school’s main training floor has 13 double-sided salon station setups for a total of 26 stations; an area for mixing hair dyes, two classrooms and an Internet bar where students can access the Web along with an internal system that houses the school’s curriculum materials. Stoltz, who has 10 years in the hair business, says it all started when she had a dream about owning a school. “I could see all of us as a family working there,” Stoltz said. “She called me in the middle of the night,” Martinez said. “I said, ‘Go to sleep.’” But it stuck with her, and Martinez said Stoltz...

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