Day: May 14, 2010

Prinicpals may get raises

By HERB SWETT For the Keizertimes First reading of a proposed salary increase for principals and assistant principals went before the Salem-Keizer School board on Tuesday. The board is expected to vote on the proposal in June.  The goal is to get the salaries in line with those of principals and assistant principals in districts of similar size and demographics in the same region of Oregon. Early in the meeting, two people in the audience spoke against the proposal, saying it was inconsistent with the district’s financial problems and the financial sacrifices other district employees had to make. Superintendent Sandy Husk said the proposal was consistent with proposals made for both teachers and classified employees. She said that when different cost-cutting options were offered to the three groups last year, the administrators asked to forgo the cost-of-living adjustment (COLA), the teachers wanted a reduction in days worked, and the classified  employees wanted a combination of those options. When the financial scenario for the coming school year looked better than the one for the current year, Husk said, the district reversed its actions regarding the teachers and the classified employees. The administrators, Husk explained, had a choice between restoring the COLA and raising the salary schedule. They preferred the latter, she said. Carla Gunter, coordinator of programs and benefits in the district human resources office, said that the proposed salary...

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Young tracksters ready to blaze own trails at districts

By LANCE MASTERSON Of the Keizertimes While there’s little question the McNary track program, especially the varsity girls team, is loaded with senior talent, several youngsters are making their presence known. “It goes in waves, and I think that this certainly is a large number that is making an impact,” McNary Coach Kelley Borresen said of her freshman and sophomore athletes.  “I wouldn’t say that it’s the most we’ve ever had, but it’s certainly a high number of young athletes that are stepping into (a varsity role).” The list of youngsters who are making an impact at the varsity level includes, for the boys: Aaron Hudson in the 100 meters, Dylan McHugh in the 800 and 1500 meters, Anthony Davis in the 110-meter hurdles, Austin Anderson in the javelin and Kevin Groves in the high jump. All but Hudson are sophomores. Each was rated among the Central Valley district’s top 10 in their respective events as of Thursday, May 6. Hudson, a freshman, is keeping pace with a fast crowd that includes another freshman, Chris Wiggins of North Salem. Wiggins is the only runner to defeat Hudson when they were in the seventh and eighth grades. Wiggens was ranked third, at 11.38, and Hudson eighth, at 11.55. “Competition is really rough (in high school),” Hudson said. Hudson added: “I mean, tenths of a second matter. In middle school, either...

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Choir’s timing is just right at state

By LANCE MASTERSON Of the Keizertimes As it turned out, seven seconds were all that separated the McNary concert choir from second place at the state choir competition and disqualification. “You’re supposed to be on stage for a total of 20 minutes, so our music alone being almost 20 minutes made that hard. We had to go on stage and get off stage really fast,” said senior choir member Kody Flores. There was a reason for the haste. A choir is disqualified from the competition if it exceeds the 20-minute mark. The exit was so fast one of the singers didn’t have time to retrieve her shoe. Choir members knew they were going to push the limit, and some modifications strayed from tradition. “The tradition for conductors is to put their arms down (after a song) so that the audience knows when it’s time to clap,” said senior Ashley Eddings. “(Choir Director Jim) Taylor didn’t have time to put his arms down. He conducted all of our pieces and then the audience got to clap, because we didn’t have time.” Still, the choir had those seven seconds to spare. The final results surprised some choir members. “When they said Jesuit got fifth, I didn’t hear them so I didn’t know how good they were,” said Brandon Busciglio, a senior. “And then Sprague got fourth and I thought, ‘oh, crap.’...

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Pioneers tried to avoid the D’s

By JERRY McGEE for the Keizertimes The pioneers who came over the Oregon Trail developed a close bond based primarily upon their shared experiences on “The Trail.” They never missed an opportunity to gather to retell their stories. Weddings, funerals, barn raisings and yes, even a hanging were all reasons to gather together to swap yarns. It is said that the pioneers seldom talked about what they referred to as the “three D’s:” Dust, Disease and Death. Every wagon train had its share of each. Invariably one memory was always recalled. In most diaries kept by the pioneers there will be mention of one specific camp. The unusual thing about this campsite was that they observed that the water from the spring ran west, not east or south. This was very significant to them because it told them that they had indeed crossed the “Great Divide.” They were through the Great Stony Mountains (the Rockies). And since’ the boundary of the Oregon Territory was determined to be the crest of the Rockies, they were now officially in Oregon. One pioneer who had contracted Laramie fever rose up from his wagon bed and asked, “Is it true that the water is running west?” He was assured that it was true. “Then I made it to Oregon I” He died a short while later and he was buried in Oregon. The...

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